Mike Cunningham

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  • #14713

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    FWIW, attached is what I have so far; I plan on wrapping the whole bottom with ABS, and using the “cutouts” in the heatsink as the anchor point for the extruder.. still working on the duct work to get that rear fan to blow on the nozzle…. now I see why car makers use clay… soooooooo many measurements :/

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    #14711

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    Very nice… but 2 questions:

    1) The hotend doesn’t make goo out of the part that’s nearly touching it?

    2) Why is the filament lever in the back?

    I have been working on something similar over the past few days, but the bottom of mine kind of looks like a flying saucer :/ still have a lot of finishing touches before I can actually print it… like deciding where I’m going to stick the spool of filament :/

    V/r,
    Mike

    #14704

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    a 7805 is not a mosfet…. It’s a 5v voltage regulator; there is a significant difference between the 2.

    Also, in the pictures I see, that driver board is missing a lot of important components; unless they hid them under the board like ninjas, that will only be able to regulate voltage, not current… Odds are, that driver will burn out your laser very quickly. Just sayin’…

    And then of course, there is the fact that Nichia does not make a 2000mW diode… so there’s that…. ….

    V/r,
    Mike

    #14466

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    Short answer: No.

    Longer Answer: No, it will not.

    Assuming that you have a decent powered laser, that will be focused at 30-60mm, you should have a usable range of about 15mm (7.5 up and down from the point of focus)

    If you are doing image burning, the picture will get a little lighter/darker (depending on your focus point) towards one end of the table; but 2mm shouldn’t be noticeable.

    On the other hand, you could always loosen the flex foot on that side, lift the conduit 2mm, and re-tighten it… personally, I used a 1/2″ 6″ ratchet extension, with a socket in it, to even mine up.

    #13930

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    If you can create a version with no bolt holes for the bearing bolts, except the important ones (like the one that the 5″ bolt goes through in the XY); I could create a relatively simple parametric openscad script to space the remaining holes for any size pipe (within reason)

    the holes won’t be all neat and rounded, and the flare will be squared; but if you print at 100mm/s, all of the corners get rounded anyhow 😉

    #13874

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    For speed control, I went redneck.

    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1635710

    vacuum and spindle are powered by a ….. less than NEC-approved gang box, behind the router. 2x 20A relays, wired to digital outputs, each relay feeds one of the plugs.

    With my servo solution, you have to add M280 P0 S0 (max speed) or M280 P0 S180 (min speed) with the stock firmware, and M42 P57/58 S0/1 (A3/A4 on AUX-1) to control the relays.

    As an electronics engineer, I’ve significantly modified Marlin on my ramps, adding the appropriate M3/M5 and M10/M11 commands. in Marlin_main.cpp, around line 6500, add the appropriate case blocks for the commands you want to add, then add them higher in the file… here is my M3/M5, for example:

      inline void gcode_M3() {
        OUT_WRITE(SPINDLE_ENABLE, HIGH);
        int servo_index = code_seen('P') ? code_value_short() : 0;
        int servo_position = 0;
        if (code_seen('S')) {
          servo_position = code_value_short();
          if (servo_index >= 0 && servo_index < NUM_SERVOS)
            servo[servo_index].move(servo_position);
          else {
            SERIAL_ERROR_START;
            SERIAL_ERROR("Servo ");
            SERIAL_ERROR(servo_index);
            SERIAL_ERRORLN(" out of range");
          }
        }
      }
      
      inline void gcode_M5() {
        OUT_WRITE(SPINDLE_ENABLE, LOW);
      }

    EDIT 1: and the code lower, in the switch (I put it right after M81):

          case 3: // M3: Turn on SPINDLE_ENABLE relay, P=servo number (defaults 0), S=servo setting (180-0)
            gcode_M3();
            break;
    
          case 5: // M5: Turn off SPINDLE_ENABLE relay
            gcode_M5();
            break;
    

    edit 2- don’t forget to define SPINDLE_ENABLE somewhere (like your pins.h file), to identify which pin the relay is on

    edit 3- most SSR relays can not switch fast enough, and will BBQ if you hook them up to PWM. The highest reasonable rate to cycle a SSR is about 10Hz (10 times per second), and even that will burn it up quickly (within a few months)

    V/r,
    Mike

    #13812

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    When you click the Upload button in Arduino, it compiles all of the tabs together, into one file, and uploads it to the Arduino.

    Anyhow, I need to get my mind off of this thing for a few days… 22 hours into re-printing my Roller_F’s, the filament ran out on my 3d printer :/

    V/r,
    Mike

    #13785

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    What firmware are you using? Is it the on pre-loaded by vicious1?

    If not, confirm your pins.h (pins_RAMPS14_EFB.h or w/e your using), make sure they are not on the same pin..

    The alternative is that you may have a defective RAMPS/Arduino (or both), or theres a speck of solder/metal on one of them.

    You could build a simple sketch to confirm:

    #define Y_STEP_PIN         60
    #define X_STEP_PIN         54
    
    void setup() {
      pinMode(54, Y_STEP_PIN);
      pinMode(60, X_STEP_PIN);
    }
    
    void loop() {
      digitalWrite(Y_STEP_PIN,1);
      digitalWrite(X_STEP_PIN,0);
      delay(500);
      digitalWrite(Y_STEP_PIN,0);
      digitalWrite(X_STEP_PIN,1);
      delay(500);
    }

    remove the stepper drivers, and connect a LED from the STEP pin to ground; that sketch should alternate the LED between both pins, and both should not be on at the same time. If they are, you have a short.

    #13783

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    Unzip the file to a folder, and double-click on the “Marlin.ino” file. Tab over to configuration.h, and ensure that all of the lines at the website below match.

    Firmware

    The rest is pretty self explanatory (verify Port in the Tools menu, upload)

    Second: confirm wiring… 2B and 2A are a pair, and need to go to their own coil. likewise with 1B/1A. If this is the issue, the motors should not move at all; but I’ve seen weirder things.

    Third: Are all of your Microstepping jumpers in place, under the Pololu drivers?

    Fourth: Have you calibrated your Pololu drivers properly?

    #13757

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    With 5″ Legs, you would have:

    Usable Height: 4.5″
    Leg Height: 5″ (Usable Height +0.5″)
    Z Rail Height: 12″ (Usable Height +7.5″)
    Lead Screw: 7.5″ (Usable Height +3″)

    V/r,
    Mike

    EDIT: BTW, when you cut your X/Y rails, just cut all 3 of each to the same length; makes for a decent guide to keep your stepper wires off of the belts.

    #13755

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    Legs = Usable Height – 13mm (.5in)

    Conduit, Rails, Tubes, Pipes…

    For most jobs, 4″ usable height is more than enough; any more will introduce excessive Z rail flex (entire center gantry flexes, making the bit wobble around). I made the mistake of making mine 9″, and have regretted it since.

    Don’t forget to leave yourself an extra inch above your actual max height, for tool changes and variations in bit lengths.

    V/r,
    Mike

    #13739

    Mike Cunningham
    Participant

    If you have steady hands, and patience, it is not hard to make your own wiring harness for odd-sized setups.

    4P Dupont connectors and pin connectors can be had on ebay for next to nothing. Below are the ones I used, for reference.
    4P Dupont Connectors: http://www.ebay.com/itm/272235660221 (Got a bag of 100, only actually used ~10)
    Female Dupont Pin Connectors: http://www.ebay.com/itm/272235659912

    For reference, below are my wire lengths.

    As for measurements, here are my lengths for reference. My MPCNC work area is 20″ wide, 14″ deep, and 9″ high (I plan on cutting it down to 4″ high soon), the electronics are mounted 5″ below the front left leg, under the table. The Cable Chains are 38″ Front, 30″ Left, and 36″ Top (comes out at left stepper)

    My lengths (with ~12″ spare wire, for stripping/routing in the electronics boxes)
    Z Stepper wire: 96″ 18AWG SS 4c
    Spindle Wire bundle (rpm sensor, spindle temp sensor, servos, Z Probe, Z MAX Endstop, Z MIN Endstop, light, fan, laser guide): 104″ CAT6 SS
    Right Stepper: 83″ 18AWG SS 4c
    Left Stepper: 52″ 18AWG SS 4c
    Rear Stepper: 84″ 18AWG SS 4c
    Front Stepper: 60″ 18AWG SS 4c
    X/Y MAX Endstops: 82″ 22AWG SS 4c (Rear Right Corner)
    X/Y Min Endstops: 27″ 22AWG SS 4c (Front Left Corner)

    The endstops are not necessary, but I am using 84oz/in steppers, capable of rapidly disassembling the machine on a crash.
    The AC Line for my spindle hangs from an arm, so it does not create an EMF in the cable trays.
    For a most setups, you can get away with 20AWG4cSS, or even 22AWG4cSS cable for the steppers; but an extra $10 for heavier guage wire can save you a lot of headaches in the future.
    For my spindle wire bundle, I used 2 runs of STRANDED shielded CAT6 cable, similar to http://www.ebay.com/itm/301380750074 It is VERY important that you use STRANDED cable, not solid. Solid wire will break after ~10 hours of operation of the mill.
    For my stepper motors, I used 18AWG 4 connector stranded shielded security system cable.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)