Using the Mp3DP for a laser

New Home Forum Milled Printed 3D Printer -MP3DP Advice – MP3DP Using the Mp3DP for a laser

This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Jethro 3 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #104672

    Edward
    Participant

    Hello all,

    I was thinking about using a 3d printer frame for laser engraving. Considering the laser sits a a fixed point on the Z axis do you think its feasible to omit the Z axis motors? I’m thinking that you could adjust the focal length manually with threaded rods and hold it in position with a nut on either side of the carriage. Any thoughts?

    #104674

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    Sure could. You could use 3/16″ threaded rod to save a few dollars. You’d need something to replace the bearings in those blocks.

    The advantage of having a cnc Z is that you can use a script to try different heights to find the best distance. If you have a different material thickness, you can also just adjust it up perfectly.

    You’ll still need to get a level bed, though not as precisely. So being able to drop the Z down to the bed will help with that.

    So how much will you really save vs. the advantages of having a Z?

    #104675

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    Also, you should consider using a grbl controller. the laser engraving is still better than marlin, afaik.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #104723

    Edward
    Participant

    Well part of this is driven by the challenge of building this out of the spare parts box. I have a cheap laser and the focal length is 58 mm so I was thinking I could just adjust the Z by hand and lock it in.

    As far as the GRBL part goes, I know what it is but i have almost no idea how it works. Do you have a preferred website that you could share?

    #104745

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    FWIW, Marlin will work fine. The grbl github has the manual, I think. But it’s simpler than Marlin, so probably any guide will get you there. I can’t remember what I read when I tried it the first time.

    #105609

    Edward
    Participant

    So here is the update. I am reusing the printed parts from a DOLLY clone for the frame. I learned (enough) about GRBL and loaded it on to an UNO with a CNC shield. I was on a roll with the build and didn’t want to stop and wait for parts so I 3d printed LM8 bearings, toothed pulleys, mock NEMA17 motors for the Z axis, and a GT2 belt extender. I also used some 5/16 dowel rod in place of the 8mm steel rods. I’ll(probably) replace all these with the REAL parts when they arrive. I also need to design and print a bracket for the laser( or maybe the twisted up wire will hold up).

    #105620

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Whoa! Use those dowels until they fail, I need to know how long they last, that is too cool!

    #105630

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    Those parts remind me of something…

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/rtK6hr5XTSbuxwNV8

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #105645

    Edward
    Participant

    Ryan,

    I am surprised how well the dowel rods are working. I sanded them down with some 120 grit and then put onĀ  a coat of beeswax. By no means are they as effortless to push than “normal” rods, but they do slide very well.

    I am using LaserGRBL for the Gcode streamer( http://lasergrbl.com/en/) . I have never used GRBL before but I am impressed at how well this is working. I also flashed the hex file from 3dpburner onto the arduino in place of the latest GRBL from github. It worked with the github but the jog command was sluggish. It may have been a setting I overlooked but a big part of this project was to learn new things.

    #108201

    Jethro
    Participant

    Wow, never went that far yet. I remember one YT video trying to build the cheapest Prusa clone.

    I was always thinking of using cheap rods from the hardware store and print the bearings, together with the usual 8mm rods that would reduce the costs already significantly.

    In the video, he uses hose-clamps and a bit of hose as a coupling, and pretty sure it is fine. I printed some for the MPCNC, after crushing with the aluminum ones into the base plate. You can kiss them Goodby after that. The printed one do just fine, actually because of that, I found out that the stepper motors have quite a bit play in the axis as well.

     

     

     

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