Screwdriver holder

New Home Forum Things You Have Made Screwdriver holder

This topic contains 44 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  chris thornborrow 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)
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  • #52482

    Hubert
    Participant

    I cut two more tool holders today at 3.5mm depth of cut and speed dial set to 5. I am happy to report that it sounded like a router cutting and no longer like a banshee.

    On the second one, I tried climb milling instead of conventional, which made no appreciable difference in the amount of fuzz on top. Curiously, there were small dimples cut into the part above all the tabs. I don’t know if that’s related to climb milling or not. The only other difference was where on the bed the part was cut from. I’ll keep an eye on it and report back if I can determine the cause of the dimples.

    Thanks to everybody for your help figuring out how to use the machine. I am pretty excited about how it performs.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #52488

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    I’m not sure I helped.

    I can say that a downcut but works great for fuzz in plywood. You just can’t plunge straight down (or drill).

    #52527

    Hubert
    Participant

    Does the down cut have the same problem as the up cut, just on the other side? The bottom (which I have been using as the top) looks perfect with the up cut bit. I am not too concerned about the finish, it’s just tool holders for the shop I am making, after all.

    I have never used a compression bit, but maybe that’s just the thing to use to have both sides come out nice. What I don’t really understand with down cut or compression bits is where the chips are supposed to go. The up cut bit I am using already has some trouble getting the chips out on the deepest pass and that is in 12mm (~1/2″) material. Maybe a vacuum or compressed air would help with that.

    #52545

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    The down side isn’t as bad, because it has the spoil board as a backer, but it does still get some fuzz.

    I’ve never tried a compression bit, but it seems like there would be a lot less flexibility, because you need to have the crossover point in the material.

    The chips have a lot of speed, and they get everywhere, but there are still a lot in the cut. I sometimes follow it around with the shop vac, but it’s not a huge deal. Maybe I’m not pushing my machine hard enough.

    #52822

    Hubert
    Participant

    I made two more tool holders yesterday, one for pliers and one for a Japanese saw. For the pliers, I cut two Baltic birch brackets on the CNC and inserted a ~30cm piece of 8mm stainless rod between them. I really like the way this one turned out. I made a similar one by hand some time ago which looked quite a bit cruder in comparison. I think this is the only CNC project so far where I would say I saved time vs building by hand. The design on the computer was quick, it took less than five minutes to cut the two brackets and there was minimal sanding required.

    pliers

    For the saw, I cut pockets into a piece of plywood for the blade and the spine. There is a small magnet behind the blade. This one I am not 100% happy with. There is a little too much space on the right side and I had all kinds of problems with splintering. I was able to fix most of it with CA glue. It holds the saw fine, though, so I’ll call it a success.

    saw_holder

    #52827

    SquidPlan
    Participant

    Hubert, what are you using for software?  The only thing I can quickly design is a circle or a square.  🙂

    Nice work too.  I will have to borrow some of our ideas if I ever get around to getting things more organized.

    #52832

    Hubert
    Participant

    I used inkscape. It is quick and easy if you know how to do it, but it is not really obvious if you don’t. It took me a while to get used to inkscape. For the pliers bracket, I started with a circle, then converted to a path, added extra nodes and moved those to make the part of the bracket that attaches to the wall. I also had to convert the node type on the corner nodes and move the tangent handles on a few nodes to obtain a decent looking curve.

    For the saw holder, I scanned the cardboard blade guard that came with the saw and conveniently had an illustration of the blade itself printed on it. I imported that into inkscape and drew Bezier curves on top.

     

    #52834

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    I used inkscape. It is quick and easy if you know how to do it, but it is not really obvious if you don’t. It took me a while to get used to inkscape. For the pliers bracket, I started with a circle, then converted to a path, added extra nodes and moved those to make the part of the bracket that attaches to the wall. I also had to convert the node type on the corner nodes and move the tangent handles on a few nodes to obtain a decent looking curve.

    For the saw holder, I scanned the cardboard blade guard that came with the saw and conveniently had an illustration of the blade itself printed on it. I imported that into inkscape and drew Bezier curves on top.

    I just can’t understand Inkscape. I really want to. Someone I know who uses Inkscape and some other cad programs said Inkscape is for form and cad is for functionality. I do use it to convert images to SVG, but that’s it so far. I just get frustrated when I want something to be exactly spaced for something.

    I like that pliers holder. I have a stack of pliers I need to attach to my tool wall. I think I’ll use your idea.

    #52837

    Hubert
    Participant

    If you want exact in inkscape, turn off stroke and use only fill. That way, the size reported is the actual size and does not include the width of the stroke. You can also set your grid to whatever your spacing needs to be or make guide lines and the software will snap control points to the right spot. If that doesn’t work, you can manually enter the location of the control points. I don’t really have any experience with CAD software, we still had to hand draw everything when I went to engineering school. I started using inkscape for illustrations after years of using xfig, maybe that explains why I like it.

    If you decide to make a pliers holder similar to mine, don’t make the hole for the rod too tight. It is easy to break the outer ply when you hammer in the rod if the hole is too tight. Let me know if you want the SVG file for the brackets.

    #52842

    SquidPlan
    Participant

    I’ll have to find some inkscape tutorials.  What you describe is the sort of drawing I once did in Freehand.  I understand the concepts but haven’t figured that program out enough.  I have Illustrator via subscription but it doesn’t make sense either.  :p

    #52843

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    If you find a good tutorial, please share. The problem I had was that they were not aimed at doing precise work in Inkscape.

    #53007

    Ulli
    Participant

    Hi there,

    Interesting exchange. Enough to motivate me again to cut off some time from other projects and finish my mpcnc, first design generation. Hubert, you seem to live in Germany too, correct? I am near Kiel.

    As an entry level 2D CAD program, I can  recommend QCAD. Worth to look at it. Postprocessing is then best done with ESTLCAM.

    Cheers,

     

    Ulli.

    #53011

    Hubert
    Participant

    Hubert, you seem to live in Germany too, correct?

    What gave you that impression? Felo and Wera screwdrivers? Knipex pliers? My English grammar? The time stamps on my posts? Maybe the filename of the picture I posted? Well, all completely misleading clues to my true location. I actually visit Japan more often these days than I do Germany, that’s why the douzuki saw!

    I live in the USA. But I did grow up (mostly) in Germany.

    Enjoy building your MPCNC, it is a really fun project.

    #61650

    Tchad Rogers
    Participant

    You gotta try a single flute

    I have finally gotten around to trying out a couple of single flute bits, with mixed results.

    I tried a 1/8″ single-flute up-cut on my MPCNC cutting pine, and it worked wonderfully. It reduced the vibration and noise that I had from a similar, two flute bit. I’m sticking with it for my MPCNC routing.

    I also tried a 1/4″ single-flute in my Shapeoko 3, and the result wasn’t as good. The S3 has the rigidity and torque to push a 2-flute upcut through softwood relatively fast — 55 IPM or so at 17,000 RPM, and my dust collection does a good enough job keeping the slot clear that it cuts clean. Moving to a single-flute bit, GWizard recommended dropping back to 30 IPM at 17,000 RPM (in both cases, 1/4″ cut depth and 0.1″ step-over). It cut more or less fine, but took way longer, and the finish wasn’t as good as my 2-flute. Probably this is just because I didn’t spend time tweaking and perfecting speeds and feeds like I did with my “go-to” bit, but the much lower feed rate means it doesn’t make sense on a machine that can go faster without chattering.

    So in the end, the single-flute exhibited what I read it should… less vibration because it only has one face in contact with the stock at a time. With the MPCNC this translated into cleaner cuts. On the S3, it merely translated into slower cut times (at least in softwood). I bet in a harder material where the S3 is once again limited by stiffness, a single-flute bit would work better for the same reasons it worked better on the MPCNC.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #97762

    chris thornborrow
    Participant

    Oh nice some serious screwdrivers – especially the wooden wihas that wont ruin over time (unlike the rubber ones). Total thumbs up for the rack and screwdrivers! I would show you my rack but its embarressing compared to this. Guess I better get on with my mpcnc

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)

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