My MPCNC made in China

New Home Forum Mostly Printed CNC – MPCNC Your Builds – MPCNC My MPCNC made in China

This topic contains 354 replies, has 42 voices, and was last updated by  Mike Pensinger 1 month, 1 week ago.

Viewing 30 posts - 91 through 120 (of 355 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #33937

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Not sure what is actually killing the board from the plasma though, So many things I don’t understand about that kind of electronics. I understand the basics but HF is magic to me.

    I’m pretty sure it is induced currents going back to the drivers.
    Basically, you have a big ass cable from the plasma, with high currents flowing back and forth at high speed. This is inducing magnetic fields, which in return are inducing currents in the motor wires. This current goes back to the drivers and fries them.

    I’m pretty sure this is how it works there, because I checked and the driver was fried. I don’t see how it could have die otherwise.
    So I see 2 main solutions here: either put the plasma wire far away from the motor drivers, to reduce this effect, either shield the motor wires.
    I’ll do both and see what is going on.

    An other important thing is that I didn’t connect my plasma cutter to the ground last time I used it, so it is possible that this caused the issue.
    Anyway, I really hope that grounding everything will solve these problems, otherwise I’ll reach an impass… The only remaining solution would be to use optocouplers for motor command, but I’m not sure I’ll be able to do that given my level in electronics.

    #33948

    MrMeatGrinder
    Participant

    I work with CNC plasma a lot for my day job. There are a number of reasons why you might be frying your electronics with your plasma. First, are you running your plasma ground cable and torch cable away and in a different direction from your other cables as much as possible? Are you grounding your plasma cutter’s clamp as close to your work piece as possible? Is it possible that there is some sort of conductive material from your table that is touching any electronic housing? The list is pretty big, but if you haven’t found a good shielding for all of your cables and run them behind cover away from all the angry plasma pixies, I’d try that first. If that doesn’t work, you can always bypass your HF by using an improvised pilot arc with a current sensing switch on your torch, I had success with that on the cheapest of the cheap plasma cutters.

    EDIT: I just found the stuff that we use at work. It’s not exactly the same as ours, but you get the idea. http://a.co/fInlmWX

    I really dig your builds though. I’ve used Tinkercad with some kids before and I’m impressed that you make such masterful use of it!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #33992

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    I work with CNC plasma a lot for my day job. There are a number of reasons why you might be frying your electronics with your plasma. First, are you running your plasma ground cable and torch cable away and in a different direction from your other cables as much as possible?

    The first time I tried I was running the plasma cable all the way along with the Z motor cable… Would have been very hard to make it worse XD
    I thought afterwards that it was a very stupid idea. Next time I’ll run it as far as I can from any other wire.

    Are you grounding your plasma cutter’s clamp as close to your work piece as possible?

    Yes, the clamp was directly linked to the metal plate I was cutting

    Is it possible that there is some sort of conductive material from your table that is touching any electronic housing?

    Not likely, the table is made of wood and the enclosures were made of plastic. The only conductive physical link are the motor wires

    The list is pretty big, but if you haven’t found a good shielding for all of your cables and run them behind cover away from all the angry plasma pixies, I’d try that first.

    I will.
    Meanwhile, if there is any other elements from the list that you think might worth mentioning, I’m all ears!

    If that doesn’t work, you can always bypass your HF by using an improvised pilot arc with a current sensing switch on your torch, I had success with that on the cheapest of the cheap plasma cutters.

    I’m not sure my plasma is a HF start kind.
    It is one of the cheapest available (and I live in China, so cheap really means cheap here)
    Is there any instruction on how to build this “pilot arc with current sensing switch” thing?

    EDIT: I just found the stuff that we use at work. It’s not exactly the same as ours, but you get the idea. http://a.co/fInlmWX

    Yeah, I was thinking of using this. The only issue is that I’m a bit lazy to remove and replace all my RJ45 plugs to pass this sleeve onto the cable.
    But I’ll do it for sure if I blow up another Arduino on my next attempt
    Thanks a lot for your great help, I really appreciate it!

    I really dig your builds though. I’ve used Tinkercad with some kids before and I’m impressed that you make such masterful use of it!

    Thanks for the kind words!
    I tried using Fusion 360 but Tinkercad remains my favorite, it is so much faster and convenient to use… You can draw anything in a few minutes, takes much more time on fusion which is less intuitive. Just misses a few functions to be perfect, like drawing a sketch or having the ability to edit a specific edge. Other that this it’s the perfect tool for noobs like me XD

    #34020

    MrMeatGrinder
    Participant

    Here’s a link to the improvised pilot arc. I think you’d be surprised at how inexpnsive high frequency plasma cutters can be. The cheap ones do tend to implement a rather barbaric application of high frequency though. https://www.machsupport.com/forum/index.php?topic=20076.0

    #34220

    Bill
    Participant

    Back when I was hooking external SCSI drives to my Amiga computers, I used ribbon cables that had twists for each pair of wires, something like this.

    #34260

    Barry
    Participant

    I remember those!

    #34382

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Well, turns out that the screen cable I ordered is a super tiny cable… Looks the same at the original one, but the plugs and wires are 4 times smaller… So I’ll need to search again.

    Anyway, my printer is now back into working condition. I made the following improvements during the last few days:
    -Finalizing my watercooling system: got myself a decent pump and water tank from a computer watercooling system.
    -Changed the parts cooling fans: I’ve installed a beefy server 40mm fan. Super duper powerful, far too much. When I run it at full blast, it cools the nozzle so much that it cannot go over 120 Degree C, even though it is not directly blasting at it. I run it at around 15% of its capacity so that it works fine, but I’ll need to insulate my nozzle from the air flow. Probably will use kapton as well as a wooden insulating wall, or maybe some hair dryer insulating sheet.

    I printed a huge part that will be the door of my electronics compartment. This is my biggest successful 3D print so far, apparently the retractation worked fine with the watercooling and I did not have any clogging at any time, which was the whole purpose of watercooling in the fist place, so I’m pretty happy.
    Also, no leaks on my cooling system so far, despite its simplicity… That’s a very good surprize, I wasn’t expecting this to work at first, turns out I’ll probably keep it that way. Probably the cheapest possible way to watercool a print head, just 2 O-rings, a few centimeters of silicon tube, zip ties and 2 quick release air pressure fittings… I think it could be something useful for many people using 3D printers who want to print at higher temperatures.

    Anyways, as usual, a few pics:

    The new fan: 0.69Amps at 12V, I could probably strap two of those things on my back and got myself a jetpack XD

    The electronic compartment door while printing:

    That’s quite a huge print, almost the maximum my printer can do in Y dimension. Took 4 hours to complete.

    Test fitting of the door, I think it doesn’t look too bad:

    The little water pump/tank of the watercooling system:

    Next step is to finish the enclosure, I’ll use some transparent plexiglas for the middle part of the door, print some brackets for the fans, organize the cables, etc. Still quite a bit of work to do, but it should be ready soon.

    #34396

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Holy cow!

    That is for sure the largest print I have ever seen on a non-parts daddy. Good work.

    I do love the water cooling idea, so simple and I am sure it is super effective.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34519

    earwax
    Participant

    Has your linear bearings cut your linear pipe/rod any? I had this issue with a printer I built one time. I had deep grooves the entire length of my rods

    And would you mind sharing your hotend mount with the optical sensor crash probe? I love the setup.

    #34522

    chung
    Participant

    很好很好! 非常好,请问怎么联系,我也做了一台,但是速度没那么快。

    Attachments:
    #34540

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Has your linear bearings cut your linear pipe/rod any? I had this issue with a printer I built one time. I had deep grooves the entire length of my rods

    Nope, not even the slightest mark. Those tubes are amazingly strong, I think if something dies at some point it will be the bearings, but so far no problem at all.

    And would you mind sharing your hotend mount with the optical sensor crash probe? I love the setup.

    Sure, no problem. I modified it a little for you so that it should work better than mine. On mine the center pieces were shorter, so I had not enough leverage and the print head crashed a bit too much into the print bed. I’ve been lazy to reprint this part ever since… so you motivated me! Let me know how this version performs!

    You’ll need to find two little springs (mine came from an old remote control battery terminal), a few screws and washers. Also, I’m not a 3D design master, so my apologies if my model is a bit basic. You will have to manually drill two holes (the ones to attach it to the Z axis), but it is very easy. Let me know if you have any question on how to assemble it.

    You should find it attached with this post. There are 4 parts in total (one “big” and 3 little ones), all inside the same stl file. I suggest you to print them the same way as you printed the other MPCNC parts, no special parameters, no supports needed either.

    Should look like that if everything goes well:

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #34876

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    This weekend’s little project with my MPCNC: building an air duct for my electric scooter watercooling system.

    My electric scooter is my daily driver, I modified it entirely myself and it can easily compete with 250cm3 motorbikes. Acceleration from 0-50 km/h takes 2.9 seconds, it can reach 100km/h and has a range of about 100 km.
    The only issue I had was heat, the motor controller was enclosed inside the machine with no direct access to any kind of air flow.

    So I built a watercooling system using computer parts. Worked ok, but it was not enough during the hot days of summer, because I couldn’t find a spot where the radiator could get sufficient air flow. I decided to build a scoop using the MPCNC, to force the air to the radiator.

    I had to make two versions, the first one looked too weird, due to my poor 3D design skills. Eventually I found out how to design the part I wanted, but this time I tried Onshape instead of Tinkercad. I think I’ll use Onshape from now on, it’s better now that I know the basics.

    Anyway, the part took around 3 hours to print, print quality is ok. The part feels very solid, I’m super confident it can last.

    Some pics of how it looks like:

    During printing:

    Second version (left) vs first version (right)

    First fitting tests:

    Job done:

    I tested it during one hour riding at full blast and the controller barely got warm, so it turns out to work absolutely great!

    Next step will be to smooth the part, using putty and the paint it, to make it look like an original part.

    I love my MPCNC !!

    #34898

    Andy
    Participant

    Going to have to do the same for my emax 110s when i update the controller to a custom one with water cooling, hopefully that will be this year as my friend is getting close to a final controller design. I think i was planning to route the water cooling to a radiator on the front right in the airflow behind the front wheel. nice work again.

    #34900

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Going to have to do the same for my emax 110s when i update the controller to a custom one with water cooling, hopefully that will be this year as my friend is getting close to a final controller design. I think i was planning to route the water cooling to a radiator on the front right in the airflow behind the front wheel. nice work again.

    You mean that you have a friend designing his own controller? BLDC one? how much power?
    I would be extremely interested if by chance he wanted to make it opensource, building my own controller is one of my dreams but I suck at electronics… If there is any website where this project is explained for noobs like me, please don’t hesitate to share me the details!!

    At first I wanted to mill a custom heat sink, but instead I went with the easy solution to just use some standard aluminum ones. Just sandwiched them on the bottom of the controller with thermal paste. Turns out that it is more than enough, at least for my 150 Amps continuous DC controller. A massive custom heatsink would definitely look cooler, but didn’t worth the hassle for me.

    A few pics of my system:

    #34906

    Barry
    Participant

    That’s pretty cool!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34907

    Andy
    Participant

    https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=87104

    My friend here is bobc on this forum and my nickname is whereswally606. I kinda got him going with what is known as the lebowski controller. in priciple we have it working with the older emax 4kw hub, as in spinning on an ikea chain like a potting wheel. His contribution here was to miniturise the controll board and design the motor drive from the mti 6pack chip. Its not opensource in hardware but you can buy the flashed chip for 25 swiss francs. we are heavilly into this and it may take years to produce something really robust and roadworthy. but i have faith. Motor controller design is this mans day job. I persuaded him to buy an emax which cost him only £80 second hand, this he went and spent a grand or so on propper batteries.

    powerwise with the single mti chip due to crazy low inductance we might be able to push 11kw which is a limit in the UK for 125cc style bikes.

    funny thing is i also have a sevcon size 4 gen4 which i am trying to get working with mine, Just no time due to projects, baby, dog and wife.

    #34938

    Al Quentin
    Participant

    Back when I was hooking external SCSI drives to my Amiga computers, I used ribbon cables that had twists for each pair of wires, something like this.

    Had several – features and hardware way ahead of their time. Latest exhumation:

    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/05/the-a-eon-amiga-x5000-reviewed-the-beloved-amiga-meets-2017/

    #34954

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=30&t=87104

    My friend here is bobc on this forum and my nickname is whereswally606. I kinda got him going with what is known as the lebowski controller. in priciple we have it working with the older emax 4kw hub, as in spinning on an ikea chain like a potting wheel. His contribution here was to miniturise the controll board and design the motor drive from the mti 6pack chip. Its not opensource in hardware but you can buy the flashed chip for 25 swiss francs. we are heavilly into this and it may take years to produce something really robust and roadworthy. but i have faith. Motor controller design is this mans day job. I persuaded him to buy an emax which cost him only £80 second hand, this he went and spent a grand or so on propper batteries.

    powerwise with the single mti chip due to crazy low inductance we might be able to push 11kw which is a limit in the UK for 125cc style bikes.

    funny thing is i also have a sevcon size 4 gen4 which i am trying to get working with mine, Just no time due to projects, baby, dog and wife.

    Yeah, I’ve red a lot about the lebowski controller on endless sphere, but it lacks one very crucial feature: being explained to total noobs. For those of us who don’t have english as mother tongue (like me), or who are not experts in electronics (like me too), it is real hard to follow.

    So I’m kind of waiting for an easy to follow tutorial, like a step by step instructable, at least to fully understand how it is supposed to work and how you can build a compatible power board, how to hook up things, etc

    I guess I could solder SMT components myself, I have a basic knowledge of how the thing is supposed to work, I know how most electronic components work, at least for the basic principles, but I’m not an engineer or technician and I wouldn’t know where to start with the lebowski controller… for me it is far too blurry. I can see the global shape, but not the details… And for these kind of things, when they are hooked up to a 3.6 KW Lithium battery, details matter…

    Maybe you and/or your friend (or someone else) could translate all that amazing stuff into an understandable thing for dummies ? XD

    #34960

    Gary
    Participant

    Hi Dui I really like the design of your machine. I hope you can answer a few questions for me would like to copy some of the parts of your build.
    1 what is the pipe that you are using?
    2 Do you print on a heated bed/ do you only print PLA?
    3 Did you do anything to stiffen your z axis to prevent wobble when you print?

    Thanks in advance.

    Gary

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34961

    Andy
    Participant

    Yeah, I’ve red a lot about the lebowski controller on endless sphere, but it lacks one very crucial feature: being explained to total noobs. For those of us who don’t have english as mother tongue (like me), or who are not experts in electronics (like me too), it is real hard to follow.

    So I’m kind of waiting for an easy to follow tutorial, like a step by step instructable, at least to fully understand how it is supposed to work and how you can build a compatible power board, how to hook up things, etc

    I guess I could solder SMT components myself, I have a basic knowledge of how the thing is supposed to work, I know how most electronic components work, at least for the basic principles, but I’m not an engineer or technician and I wouldn’t know where to start with the lebowski controller… for me it is far too blurry. I can see the global shape, but not the details… And for these kind of things, when they are hooked up to a 3.6 KW Lithium battery, details matter…

    Maybe you and/or your friend (or someone else) could translate all that amazing stuff into an understandable thing for dummies ? XD

    yes lebowski controllers are a bit more involved than most off the shelve 3ph bldc controllers but hopefully bob and I can create a platform that can be more mass producible or batch, then its a question of getting decent translations of the software setup done. For a large part of the setup there are autopresets and between bob and I we managed to get it to run a motor off the emax. This is further than ive got with the sevcon so far. The great thing about it is that the powerstage and the brain can be seperate. Arlin in Canada has a honda crx conversion running on the lebowski brain with his “game changer” power board. So you can see that the powerlevels are whatever you are capable of designing and affording. Ive been selling the through hole original design pcbs that lebowski himself designed. I still have a load of them, populated one myself and that is at bobs house. Ive been warned off using the through hole design on a road going vehicle and i think Bob has talked me round on that point. No problem on an ebike cause if it breaks you can pedal home, a moped is a different matter.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34966

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hi Dui I really like the design of your machine. I hope you can answer a few questions for me would like to copy some of the parts of your build.
    1 what is the pipe that you are using?
    2 Do you print on a heated bed/ do you only print PLA?
    3 Did you do anything to stiffen your z axis to prevent wobble when you print?

    Thanks in advance.

    Gary

    Hi Gary

    Sure, I’m happy to answer any question:

    1) I use 25mm diameter, carbon steel bearing pipe. This is designed to make rails for linear ball bearings in the industry. Maybe expensive outside of China, but it cannot rust and seems indestructible. I think the tubes skins are about 6 or 8 mm thick. The only drawback is that it is not possible to drill holes in these pipes, unless maybe using plasma cutting systems. So unfortunately for the Z axis I had to use regular stainless steel tubes.

    2)Not yet, I have to design one. for now I print only in PLA, but it’s no problem for me since I love this material. But it warps slightly so I’ll have to make a heat bed. Still thinking about what could be the best solution here, some nice folk proposed to use floor heating pads, which seems like a good idea I need to explore.

    3)Kinda. I’ve changed my skateboard roller bearings to linear bearings, which made quite a difference in terms of rigidity. I really wish I can use the same technique for the Z axis, but those bearings imply that I have to use the same special tubes I use for the other axis… the issue being that I cannot drill them so I have no way to attach the tool… If I find some way to drill holes in this material, I will replace the Z axis bearings with some semi opened linear bearings, which should help a great deal in terms of stiffness.

    The rest of the structure is very rigid, so the only remaining weak point is the Z axis connection to the other axis. I plan to try to make a central carriage in one single piece to see if this could have a positive effect on overall rigidity, but I’m not sure yet.

    But it is globally satisfying in terms of rigidity, at least for 3D printing it isn’t much of an issue.

    #35082

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hi guys,

    This weekend’s little project with the MPCNC:

    I needed a grass trimmer for a while. I could have bought one, they are pretty cheap, but it wouldn’t be fun. So I decided to use whatever I had in my workshop to build one: a dremel, some PVC tubes and my 3D printer.

    I designed all the parts in Onshape, took a few hours. I would have a hard time to do that in Tinkercad…

    Then, printed them

    Finally I assembled the thing and tested it.

    It seems to work pretty well, I just need to print the handle and also a device to fix on the motor shaft so that the wire stays more straight during use. My garden is pretty small so this little tool should do the trick!

    #35094

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    WOW! I would have never dreamt that up. You are a madman!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #35247

    Vincent Pollaro
    Participant

    Now THAT is pretty cool. I’ve designed and printed literally hundreds of models and small functional pieces, but never thought to make something like a trimmer. Hmmm.. Ideas forming in my head..

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #35292

    Bill
    Participant

    Hmm, my experience is that a used string trimmer purchased from a garage sale is almost always cheaper than a used dremel from the same sale. 🙂

    #35297

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hmm, my experience is that a used string trimmer purchased from a garage sale is almost always cheaper than a used dremel from the same sale. ?

    Sure, but when you don’t use the trimmer you can always take away the dremel and use it. Takes only one screw to remove. The point is not for the dremel to be permanently in there.

    #35310

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Now THAT is pretty cool. I’ve designed and printed literally hundreds of models and small functional pieces, but never thought to make something like a trimmer. Hmmm.. Ideas forming in my head..

    Yes, with that big printer I think that with some imagination and 3D design skills you can build almost any kind of basic power tool for your shop: sanding machines, drilling tools, toolboxes, jigs, …
    Plus, if you use the CNC and plasma cutting functionalities of the MPCNC, you can virtually build any tool, including things like a bandsaw, table saw, lathe, … I really really want to give the plasma cutting another try, I have thousand of projects in my head that could use it. So much stuff to do, so little time…

    #35322

    Andy
    Participant

    Totally agree with you here. A new trend with power tools was to modulise the power part so that you could swap the head of the tool thus has greater utility of the single motor which has to be better for the planet in terms of carbon footprint per tool, ie multitools. For the consumer the upside is that if buying their tools new and having warranties you are much more likely to wear it out inside of the warranty period (thus getting a new replacement) if you are using the one motor in everything. I really like the idea of doing something similar around a c80/100 rc motor and a quick release mechanism on the various workshop tools.

    In the old old days there was one one motor turning a single shaft running many pulleys to the various machines in a farm barn workshop. Anyway keep the ideas/creations coming it is inspiring.

    Hopefully im putting the walls of my new workshop/office up this weekend so i will doing my own ideas soon.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #35351

    Philip
    Participant

    Good Morning, I had a couple of questions about your excellent design Dui, I am working right now with a .4 mm nozzle, but it just seems to take much too long to print relatively small or simple objects, even at 60mm/s, so I’m considering getting a 1.2mm nozzle like the one on your machine and I had a couple of questions:
    First off, what speeds are you printing at, especially with that bowden extruder, does it really speed things up?
    Second, you designed a really great nozzle cooling system, but I’m not sure I have the expertise, or know where to find the parts to make one of those, and if this is a problem with the 1.2mm nozzle, do you think mounting a 60mm cooling fan onto an e3d V6 clone would suffice?
    Third, is the 1.2mm good enough for creating models with pockets for screws and other relatively small features or for creating models that use less than 5 square inches of the bed, or would a .6 or .8 be better?
    Lastly, can you explain a little bit more about your autolevel system, right now I am restricted to using about 2-3″ of my bed because I guess my MPCNC is just that unlevel…

    Thanks for all of your help,

    Philip

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #35422

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Good Morning, I had a couple of questions about your excellent design Dui, I am working right now with a .4 mm nozzle, but it just seems to take much too long to print relatively small or simple objects, even at 60mm/s, so I’m considering getting a 1.2mm nozzle like the one on your machine and I had a couple of questions:
    First off, what speeds are you printing at, especially with that bowden extruder, does it really speed things up?

    Hi Philip

    I’m not 100% sure since I don’t have my computer right now, but I think I print at around 40-50mm/sec for the perimeters, 60-70mm/sec for the infill. The first layer is slowed down to 30mm/sec for better adhesion.
    It does really speed things up, my delta printer which prints at 120mm/sec with a .4mm nozzle just cannot compete with that. I’ve made a lot of prints with both printers now, and you can safely assume that the 1.2 mm nozzle one is between 4 to 5 times faster. The great thing is that, since it is fast, I don’t hesitate anymore to create big parts that I would probably not have done with the delta since I would be worry to print something for 20 hours, then Kaboom, problem, have to restart… Did not happen to me a lot actually, but I always hated this uncertainty.

    So far, the bowden didn’t cause me much problem, works fine since it is straight and pretty short.

    Second, you designed a really great nozzle cooling system, but I’m not sure I have the expertise, or know where to find the parts to make one of those, and if this is a problem with the 1.2mm nozzle, do you think mounting a 60mm cooling fan onto an e3d V6 clone would suffice?

    I virtually have no expertise whatsoever, I’m just a random guy, my job is not even technical and I didn’t study technology or engineering at school. So if I can do it you can safely assume that anyone can ^^
    My system is just made of 2 O-rings, a bit of silicon tube and 2 quick release couplers, like the ones we are using for our bowden tubes. really nothing fancy or complicated. Maybe I should make an instructable of this, to explain better.

    It is possible that a 60mm fan could do the trick, but instead of that you might consider using a better 40 mm fan. Reason being that if you use a 60mm fan you’ll need to design some kind of funnel adapter. Fans come in different power, some of them are super powerful and for the same diameter you can have 100 times the air flow… Just like the ones I’m using for the part cooling. But in my opinion there will be two issues: noise and temp stability. With a watercooled system you are guaranteed that the temperature will keep super steady and super quiet.

    But yeah, fans are clearly the easy solution here. I just don’t think they are the best.

    Third, is the 1.2mm good enough for creating models with pockets for screws and other relatively small features or for creating models that use less than 5 square inches of the bed, or would a .6 or .8 be better?

    Very small features sometimes just cannot be done. But most of the time it is fine, So far I didn’t really had problems. Thing is that those prints need more rework, so be prepared to use a bit of sandpaper to flatten or correct some key areas. I think one thing that could correct most of the issues would be the “linear advance” feature of Marlin. I haven’t tried it yet but it is supposed to make corners much more accurate, which is so far the only problem I have with the 1.2mm nozzle.

    To come back to your question, yes, you should keep some .6, .8 or 1.0 nozzles around, changing a nozzle takes less than 2 minutes, nozzles cost peanuts, so why should you limit yourself?

    Lastly, can you explain a little bit more about your autolevel system, right now I am restricted to using about 2-3″ of my bed because I guess my MPCNC is just that unlevel…

    I’ve disabled my autolevel a while back, because I wasn’t using the endstops anymore, but I will reinstall it, because my printing area is not flat.

    I’m not sure what specific question you are asking about the autolevel, so maybe you could clarify a bit?

    But basically, the nozzle will go down, until it crashes into the build surface. At the moment it crashes, it will slighly move up the nozzle assembly, which will block the path of an IR beam sensor. This sensor will tell the arduino that it just hit the build plate at this specific point. Then the Arduino will store this value’s coordinate in its memory, move on to another spot of your build plate and repeat this process.

    This way, Marlin will generate a kind of height map, and the printer will consider this height map while printing, going up and down while doing a layer to match what it sensed as the actual build platform height. Is is not a perfect system, but it usually works fine.

    You can set up many things in marlin for this feature, like the number of points to check on the build plate (on the Delta it checks 33 different points for instance), the way it goes down (the speed, should it double check the value for each spot by going down two times, if yes, at what speed should it go down the second time, etc), and probably some other things that don’t come in my mind right now.

    So basically, the system I use doesn’t need any probe, since the nozzle itself is the probe, so virtually no offset (in reality there is a tiny Z offset because the print head moves a little while hitting the platform), and it is pretty repeatable and accurate.

    But even if the autolevel is a great feature, I still strongly advise you to find and correct your bed leveling issues at a mechanical level first. First your surface should be flat, so use some glass plate, the thicker the better.
    Then, take the time to level your printer properly. I know it is tedious but it is the key. And when I say I know it is tedious, that’s because I’m postponing this myself for a while, so my own build plate is not perfectly leveled either XD

    One more thing: printing with a 1.2mm nozzle helps quite a lot to deal with slightly unlevel beds.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
Viewing 30 posts - 91 through 120 (of 355 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.