My MPCNC made in China

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This topic contains 358 replies, has 43 voices, and was last updated by  Lionel 4 months ago.

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  • #67049

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    W.r.t. slipping at high speeds, in straight paths:

    Are you running out of heat? Certainly splitting the current will half the torque, but that’s the situation where the heat block will have the most trouble.

    Heat capacity of the block might be the primary root cause, but I can’t go really much higher since I’m already extruding at 225 degree C. I might need to machine a bigger heating block at some point to increase the heat capacity. But I didn’t have this issue with a single motor, running at similar speeds. So I guess that it because of the way motors are wired together, they get less current, so less torque.

    W.r.t. your slicer improvements:

    Marlin has a pressure based improvement. Klipper also supposedly considers extruder pressure and not just distance. That might be a better place to fix it than the slicer.

    How do they sense the pressure?

    Do you have the name of this function in Marlin so I can google it? Thanks!

    (P.S: what is the meaning of “W.r.t” ?)

    #67050

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    Do you have the name of this function in Marlin so I can google it? Thanks!

    They aren’t measuring it, just adding a “fudge factor” to accommodate it. They specifically menion higher speeds.

    http://marlinfw.org/docs/features/lin_advance.html

    (P.S: what is the meaning of “W.r.t” ?)

    “With respect to”

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #67051

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hey Dui, I would make it easier on you dual paralleled extruder steppers by making inserts for the inside of your filament spools so that they will roll on bearings around your inch diameter pipe. three bearing on a plastic printed C piece on each side would mean the unspooling would be a lot smoother. I recently made a four bearing holder where the spool ran on its rims inside of my dry box and its made a ton of different to the quality.

    Actually the issue is the inertia of the spool, because it is quite heavy and the accelerations are quite high. So whenever the print head moves, at some point it will suddenly drag the spool, but since the spool weights a lot it has quite a bit of inertia at the beginning, no matter how smooth the spool runs against the tube. The actual drag doesn’t make a big difference.

    I also converted to borosilicate bed and 8mm inductive sensor and the quality has shot up again. just waiting on the hosepipe of the correct ID for the water cooling mod to do your e3d mod. I have a set of new nozzles to experiment with which is very exciting to see how fast I can put an anet a8.

    Great! Post us some pictures once you’ll make it!

    And I got a fan thermometer controller (thermostat) to install on my enclosure then I can have the entire chamber temperature controlled so my prints should never lift, despite my unheated garage through the night.

    Yeah, that’s something I wish I could do. My wooden frame has many qualities, but being able to fit some kind of enclosure on it isn’t at all one of them… It would take some really huge modifications and I don’t have enough space in my garage to do that 🙁

    But actually a simple heated bed works absolutely fine at avoiding warping. I never really had any warping issue on my prints after installing the heating tile and the auto bed leveling, and I don’t even use brims or rafts. So you probably shouldn’t worry too much about that, unless you are printing some exotic materials (I mostly stick to PLA).

    Enclosures are mostly good for layers consistency (it reduces Z wobble and other things like that).

    #67052

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    They aren’t measuring it, just adding a “fudge factor” to accommodate it. They specifically menion higher speeds.

    Ahhh ok, it’s the linear advance stuff. I wanted to try this function for a while and then totally forgot about it 🙂

    I guess I’ll have to experiment with this, but I really hate editing the firmware when it works fine… I’ll try to motivate myself and do it this evening.

    #67106

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Well, I tried the linear advance yesterday.

    Unfortunately for me, what sounded like a walk in the park (just had to uncomment a line in the firwmare) ended up being a mess.

    I stupidly named “good version” a non working version of my firmware. After adding the linear advance, I made a first attempt and smashed the print head into my bed. Luckily nothing broke. But I spent two hours trying to find that freaking correct version of the firmware with all my stuff working.

    After finally finding it, I burned a motor driver from a loose connection. Yay.

    Then I went for a linear advance test to find the correct K values. They developped a test script that generates a gcode file, which works fine to determine what K factor your machine needs (check here) Found out that on my machine a K of 70 seemed to work well for me.

    On the first attempts, I noticed that my two extruders missed steps. They weren’t powerful enough to run smoothly. So I went back to single extruder to make sure it worked fine. Well, this linear advance feature kicks hard on our stepper motors… The extruder went blazing hot in 15 minutes, it actually went so hot that it crashed the Arduino, probably from the high currents it was draining. It did that 3 times.

    Adding a little fan on it fixed the issue (at least for now), and I was ready for  the first actual parts making. But since it was already late at this point I only did some small stuff.

    So, aside from stepper heating, is this feature any useful? Well, hell yeah! This thing works very well. The corners of the parts I’ve printed looked amazing, the infill is better, the top layers are nice. Actually it is just much better everywhere, this is really a great feature, I can’t believe it is not enabled by default in Marlin.

    I haven’t see any downside yet aside from this being hard on steppers. I still need to print many more stuff to see the limits of this option, but so far I was really, really impressed.

    I’ll print a few stuff and post pictures later in the week

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #67123

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Cool. It does seem like it should be more widely used but it does take some tuning per filament, and brand/color/chemistry even. I think if it were to get implemented into a slicer it would be a little more useful. Firmware tweaks scare people. From an “engineering” standpoint it makes a ton of sense but also seems like more work than most are willing to put in.

    I feel like we are really close to the next printing level up. Not sure what it is but I have a gut feeling FDM is going to get a little boost.

    #67127

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Cool. It does seem like it should be more widely used but it does take some tuning per filament, and brand/color/chemistry even. I think if it were to get implemented into a slicer it would be a little more useful. Firmware tweaks scare people. From an “engineering” standpoint it makes a ton of sense but also seems like more work than most are willing to put in.

    I feel like we are really close to the next printing level up. Not sure what it is but I have a gut feeling FDM is going to get a little boost.

    I think that if any kind of breakthrough happens in the next few years, it might be with the addition of cameras and image recognition. If I had the luck to be any good at programming I thing I would look into this kind of things. Just imagine a few cameras around the nozzle, constantly correcting the flow, speeds, temps, etc, to get a perfect extrusion everywhere, that would probably lead to amazing results and much faster speeds.

    #67229

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hi guys,

    I’ve made a few more tests of the linear advance function yesterday.

    So first, I wanted to see how some simple shapes would come out, so I printed a few basic stuff. The black one was printed before I enabled the linear advance. It looks way better in real life than on the pictures, but there were some issues, in particular with the corners.

    I then made the same part but with linear advance enabled (the one in red right next to it). Just perfect, aside from the few first layers where I printed with too much material and no cooling. The corners are great and the sides are perfectly flat.

    The other weirdly shaped part on the left was made to test dimensional accuracy, slight overhangs and more importantly the through holes. Everything came perfect. The holes were usually where I was having the most visible defects, most of the time I had to correct them with a file. I guess those days are gone now!

    IMG_5294

    So, since everything came out right, I decided it was time for a real challenge for my machine. I’ve printed a lot of relatively easy parts in the past, so I wanted now to see if my giant printer was an actual decent printer, not only capable of fast printing big crappy parts, but also able to print relatively difficult and intricate stuff. I settled for the iconic little boat. I printed it twice the original size otherwise it would have been very ugly with the 1.2 nozzle.

    First attempt was a semi failure: I printed it in vase mode by mistake and I had not enough filament left anyways. But the result was very encouraging and in the end I could probably use this thing to build a RC mini speed boat:

    IMG_5329

    I went back to the slicer, put a 33% infill and printed again… And it came out without any problem. There are still some tiny little things to improve, but the result is just awesome for a first attempt.

    It took around 1h50 min to print that stuff, at fairly low speed

    IMG_5300

    IMG_5312

    IMG_5314

    IMG_5335

    IMG_5336

    Great success!

    I still have a few improvements to make, I  think most of the remaining issues will be solved with better part cooling and better nozzle thermal insulation, probably a bigger heating block to keep a more constant extrusion heat too. But I’d say that 99% of the hard work is now done.

    I’ll also need to work on making the printer more reliable, make a cleaner wiring, stuff like that.

    I’ll upload a short video of the print later today.

    But wait… This freaking thing doesn’t work at all! Gimme back my money!

    IMG_5321

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #67239

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    That is great. I need to try that out. IIRC, you can completely disable it by setting the K to 0 if you wanted a comparison.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #67240

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Here is a short video:

     

    That is great. I need to try that out. IIRC, you can completely disable it by setting the K to 0 if you wanted a comparison.

    Yeah, I might do that later. But I think there would be little point in wasting more material, the linear advance option clearly makes a huge difference, I wouldn’t have been able to print the boat remotely as good without it.

    #67313

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I love it. I need to try that out soon. It seems as if Marlin is at a really stable place now and they have not touched linear advance in a while so no better time than now. Glad you are always experimenting!

    #67504

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Ok, so I made a few prints this weekend. Now I can confirm you 100%: this linear advance thing is awesome!

    First, my wife asked me to design her some kind of thing where she could put little milk containers for her coffee. I tried to convince her to drink tea instead, given the fact that she is Chinese, but she insisted and told me I was an offensive racist. Which I knew already.

    Anyway, I designed this little milk dispenser with onshape. I printed it fairly slow. It took 4 hours to print, but the main reason was the slicer. I bet it could have taken 2 hours and a half if it didn’t have to do so many useless travels to print ridiculously small infills. Unfortunately this is the only thing that I cannot tweak up in my slicer software, and the only defects I had on this part were due to this, otherwise it would have come 100% perfect.

    My wife, waiting for her little milk dispenser to be done:

    IMG_5348

    The thing after a bit of cleaning:

    IMG_5361
    IMG_5364

    And now in its final spot:

    IMG_5368

    This worked very well actually, there is almost no Z wobble visible and very few defects. The only visible defects I saw were due to not enough cooling on the right side (this will be fixed this evening) and stupid useless micro infills (unfortunately I can’t do anything about that, except to take really good care of designing my 3D parts with all dimensions being multiples of my nozzle diameter. Maybe I’ll have to experiment with other slicers.

    Anyways, I wanted to see how great of an improvement linear advance was over what I previously printed.

    So I re printed one of the arms of my laptop holder. The original one had issues during printing, I printed at a too low temp with too much cooling and it slightly delaminated in some places, so I had to reprint it. The thing wasn’t my best print, but it wasn’t my worst either, I’d say it was in the low average quality of stuff I was able to print before.

    I’ll now finally shut up and let the pictures speak for themselves. Can you tell which is which?

    IMG_5372
    IMG_5373
    IMG_5376
    IMG_5379

    So, what do you guys think, does linear advance makes a difference ? 😀

     

    #67536

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Whoa, that is a huge difference. Corners and even over hangs look much improved. I have to try this ASAP.

    #73004

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hello everyone,

    It’s been quite a while since I didn’t work on some mods on my MPCNC. Now that it works flawlessly, I think it is time to make the print head a bit more stiff and compact. It is quite a challenge since I have so many things in there, but it does take too much space currently, it looks bad and the whole thing is a bit flimsy. Plus I have to be there to untighten a screw before anytime I do an autolevel and then tighten it again just before it prints, so it is not fully autonomous.

    My plan is to try to make something more compact, to gain a bit of printing space, to do it stiffer to limit print defects and to find a way so that I don’t have to do any manual operation. I’d like also to be able to swap for a different print head in less than one minute.

    First thing I had to do was to make it stiffer. The main reason the thing is not stiff is, I think, the way nozzles are traditionally attached to the rest of the printer. I’ve got an E3Dv6 volcano, and the thing is only connected at the top, which leaves a long lever arm of about 80mm. Plus I have this whole liquid cooling system I’ve done I had to attach somehow. It’s a bit like if you try to hold a pencil, you’ll be more precise by holding it close to the tip than far away from it.

    So what I’ve done was to rethink the way I’ve done this cooling system. I made several different designs and finally found one that works, apparently. The major difficulty was of course to get the thing water tight, but it seems like I finally managed to do it.

    So basically it looks like this:

    IMG_5534

    One O-ring on the bottom:

    IMG_5535

    One O-ring on the top:

    IMG_5538

    The water comes from one of the coupling and goes out from the other. The whole thing is made out of 3 parts sandwiched and tightened together by 4 long screws

    IMG_5539

    I’ve tested it for a while and it doesn’t leak, aside from a few little holes on the sides which are due to my Delta 3D printer not working very well these days. But it’s an easy fix, just heat the tip of a screwdriver and melt the hole spot to fill it.

    IMG_5533

    I think the main concern of most of you would be “Will the plastic be able to handle the heat?”. Well I’m not 100% sure yet, I still have to test that, but I’m very confident it will. Reason being that it shouldn’t see any heat in the first place, because it will be constantly cooled by the water inside, and it won’t touch anything hot, there should always be at least one or two millimeters of gap. The fins inside will remain cold and even if they did get hot, they are not touching the plastic since there are the O-rings in between.

    I’m pretty excited about this mod, since it would be an easy, affordable and most importantly doable by anyone water cooling mod, which not only adds water cooling but also add stiffness to the whole thing. Previous method was already easy and cheap, but I think that most people didn’t have the silicon tube or didn’t know where to find it. For me, having this mod means that I can build several print heads with different nozzle sizes, and swap them in a few seconds.

    So, now that the whole nozzle assembly will be a lot stiffer, I can go ahead and design the rest of the print head.

    #73011

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Come on Dui you have a CNC, time to mill your own water block. You know it is going to happen so you might as well just go for it. Mill in a few channels, tap a few holes, clear plastic window, RTV sealant done. Take you an hour.

    #73023

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Come on Dui you have a CNC, time to mill your own water block. You know it is going to happen so you might as well just go for it. Mill in a few channels, tap a few holes, clear plastic window, RTV sealant done. Take you an hour.

    Hehe, that’s true, I could do that, but I’d like to invent the most affordable and easy system as possible and maybe contribute a little to the 3D printers community, so that anyone can do it, not only myself. This thing will be for people who own a 3D printer, obviously, but they don’t always own a CNC so it might help, who knows.

    Plus I prefer the 3D printing process, because it’s quiet, it’s not messy, it works every time and once your slicer parameters are ok it’s basically a no brainer, you don’t have to figure out paths, tools, stuff like that. 🙂

    Yeah I know, that’s just a convoluted way to say I’m lazy XD

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #73040

    Andy
    Participant

    Well Dui, I made one of you previous silicone tube style cooling mods and tested it in the sink and it was fine but I never got round to mounting it on my anet a8 cause I didn’t want to break it. I have today bought a broken printed off ebay for £44+£12 so £56 all in which hopefully the only extra I will need is an extruder motor. I figure I will get this one working and use the water cool mod. This way I can have a fine detail printer with the normal 0.4mm or less nozzle and use the new beta printer as my large scale 1.2mm nozzle job and employ that linear advance too.

    recently I got some 2mm galvanized sheet 220×220 to allow my 18m inductive sensor to see through the 3mm borosilicate glass. It worked but now my bed heat up time is stupid long. Also the next mods I need to do are making a temperature controlled enclosure that can both heat and cool. My garage office is getting too cold this time of year for decent dependable prints.

    I also want to design a printer based on the piper printer v2 and wood 20mm square cross section for the top and bottom squares. I got some of the first ideas done in fusion and can lift the rest of the parts from the original piper printer. Wierdly I have an idea that Id like to see how much of it I can mill out of wood rather than print and still have it accurate. That way I have a real project which requires me to finish my mpcnc.

    Loving your designs as always.

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #73217

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Well Dui, I made one of you previous silicone tube style cooling mods and tested it in the sink and it was fine but I never got round to mounting it on my anet a8 cause I didn’t want to break it.

    Hehe, I do understand your fear, but I never had any issue of leaks with my ghetto silicon tube system, just had a few droplets once because I did a mistake, but really nothing else. But yeah, I understand it is a bit scary because it looks totally crappy.

     

    I have today bought a broken printed off ebay for £44+£12 so £56 all in which hopefully the only extra I will need is an extruder motor. I figure I will get this one working and use the water cool mod. This way I can have a fine detail printer with the normal 0.4mm or less nozzle and use the new beta printer as my large scale 1.2mm nozzle job and employ that linear advance too.

    I’m not sure the watercooling will be very useful if your printer is a small one, but it shouldn’t hurt anyways. It will run a bit quieter and give you a more stable extruder temperature though.

    I suggest you to use linear advance on all of your printers, it will make a difference even with a small nozzle, you’ll get more accurate parts no matter what. I’ve printed quite a lot of stuff since I’ve implemented this function and seen no downside at all, it’s just better at everything.

    recently I got some 2mm galvanized sheet 220×220 to allow my 18m inductive sensor to see through the 3mm borosilicate glass. It worked but now my bed heat up time is stupid long.

    That’s something I’m about to try myself. Currently my Z probe is the nozzle itself, which works great, but I just ordered an inductive sensor two days ago to, hopefully, replace the whole system and get a bit more rigidity. But the thing that worries me is exactly what you’re talking about: I’m not sure it will work on my mirror, so I’ll have to test.

    Steel is a very poor heat conductor, so you might want to get a much thinner plate and possibly experience with some heat transmission goo. Just like the ones used on CPU cooling, you can try to apply that goo between your hot plate and the metal sheet. It won’t make miracles but it might speed things up a bit. You can get this thermal paste in big tubes since it is widely used for heatsinking mosfets, it is extremely cheap (maybe 2 or 3 bucks). Anyways, i bet it is still way faster than mine, since my heating bed takes literally 30-45 minutes to get to the right temp, even more when the garage is cold.

    I also want to design a printer based on the piper printer v2

    That looks like a sweet printer. Very similar to Ryan’s designs and totally scalable, I like it.

    #73219

    Geoffrey
    Participant

    That’s something I’m about to try myself. Currently my Z probe is the nozzle itself, which works great, but I just ordered an inductive sensor two days ago to, hopefully, replace the whole system and get a bit more rigidity.

    I installed a BL Touch a while ago, and its made printing fun again. Perfect first level every time, no fuss.

    Why are you guys using non-touch and worrying about not detecting, when a touch sensor detects everything?

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #73255

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    That’s something I’m about to try myself. Currently my Z probe is the nozzle itself, which works great, but I just ordered an inductive sensor two days ago to, hopefully, replace the whole system and get a bit more rigidity.

    I installed a BL Touch a while ago, and its made printing fun again. Perfect first level every time, no fuss.

    Why are you guys using non-touch and worrying about not detecting, when a touch sensor detects everything?

    The printer I have with an inductive sensor has PEI on top of aluminum heatbed. It gets very repeatable results, but the window is very small. It is higher than the nozzle, but sometimes collides with the print (if the print warps some) and it also sometimes fails to probe (because it doesn’t detect far enough down). It’s a small window, really. I highly doubt the mirror will work with the inductive sensor.

    The BL touch I have works well. I had a knock off one and that was ok, but not great. It was inconsistent probing in the same place. IDK, maybe I broke it early in my experiments? The authentic BL touch works great but it’s close to $40. It’s worth it IMO, but it’s a big leap amd if you wire it backwards, it goes up in smoke.

    #73533

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Why are you guys using non-touch and worrying about not detecting, when a touch sensor detects everything?

    Well, mostly because I don’t really know this thing and I’m not sure how it works. For instance, does it deploys itself or do you have to mount it on some kind of servo motorized support? An other issue is that you can’t probe directly at the spot your nozzle is, it will necessarily be offset for a few centimeters, which isn’t that accurate in the end. So basically I built my own system which seems to be pretty similar, but should solve all these issues.

    I’ve made a first assembly test this weekend to see if my design was ok. After a bit of massaging with a wood chisel it did fit right eventually.

    IMG_5548

    BTW, I have a little suggestion/request for Ryan: could you add a little section in the forum or in the website for “verified” add-ons (things that have been designed for your machines by other people and are known to work fine) and some basic documentation for people like us who try to design some accessories for your machine? I’m asking this question because I had to design this thing from scratch, and it was a bit of a pain to retrieve the dimensions between the Z tubes as well as the correct angle for the support to attach with the tubes. I did it from the STL files but it took me a bit of time and it wasn’t perfectly accurate. It wasn’t a huge work to make it right, but some kind of basic plan with key dimensions would have make my life easier. Just a thought. Personnally I don’t really like to use the default tool mount because it introduces an offset for every tool. It’s not a big offset, but it is necessarily 20 or so millimeters, which adds unnecessary lever to the Z axis.

    Anyways, the thing seems to work, I’ve let it heat at 220 degree for a few hours, the plastic is getting a bit too hot where the volcano heating block is protruding, but after putting a bit of insulation it seemed to be all right. No leaks, nothing seems to be wrong so far.

    IMG_5550

    This thing also includes a Z probe. It uses the nozzle as itself as a Z probe, just like my previous version did, but this one should be way more sturdy. The whole nozzle assembly is secured on this platform which can pivot. It is pressed down by the two beefy springs you can see at the rear. When the nozzle will hit the table, it should move the assembly very slightly, enough for a screw to cut the IR beam of the sensor you can see between the springs. If the screw is set correctly, it will only need a tiny little bit of movement, less than .01 mm to trigger the thing. Currently I’m just worried that the spring might be a bit too stiff but I’ll have to experiment and see.

    IMG_5552

    I still need to add the final thing, which will be an adjustment system for perpendicularity. Hopefully this thing should produce more repeatable and consistent results, it should be way stiffer and totally autonomous, in a much smaller package (which means a bigger print surface, I’ll gain around 120 mm on X and 50 on Y). Plus I’ll be able to switch between different nozzles in a few minutes. Next, if it works fine, I’ll just have to add a compact part cooling system.

    #73623

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I have a little suggestion/request for Ryan

    Yikes, who will do the verifying? As for the dims, just ask I will give them if I have time. Direct mounting means you have to make three versions or 2/3’s the users can’t use your part. I do understand the offset drawback though.

    #73783

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Yikes, who will do the verifying? As for the dims, just ask I will give them if I have time. Direct mounting means you have to make three versions or 2/3’s the users can’t use your part. I do understand the offset drawback though.

    I think it could be a system like “if 2-3 or more people successfully used it then it can be considered as verified”. Or maybe a few “power users” who can test some of the interesting stuff if they are willing to.

    It wouldn’t be for all the versions or all the items, but some items like endstop supports, cable chain systems, electronic boxes, some common tools like the needle cutters, drag knives, most common router brackets, vacuum systems, and whatever else I forgot. Things that most people will need at some point when they regularly use the machine and that you are not proposing to sell currently.

    Of course you wouldn’t be responsible for the support, those items could be linked with the names of people who designed them so we’d just have to redirect people’s questions or complaints/demands to their respective designers.

    Basically what I have in mind would be a page with different categories just like the ones I’ve mentionned above, a picture of the stuff, a little description about which version it can fit on, a link to the stl file, the name of the guy you should refer to for questions, or the corresponding thread and if possible leave the possibility for people to leave comments to describe how it worked for them.

    I don’t know if this is too much workload for you, in which case just forget it, but I think it might be cool, convenient and reflect the dynamism of the MPCNC community as well as all the uses you can give to this machine. Kinda the same way the gallery does it. I remember I was a bit lost at the beginning and I had to go to thingiverse, try some random stuff and having no idea if it would work, I’d prefer to be sure before printing things that sometimes didn’t work well. Anyway, just a friendly suggestion, if you have other plans or view on it I can totally understand and I won’t insist. 🙂

    #73787

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    It’s a good idea. Maybe a voting system or something. Thumbs up, or ratings. Not sure what that would take. There was a page like that early on but we evolved so fast it was quickly outdated. Now it might work.

    #74375

    Mike Pensinger
    Participant

    MPcncThingiverse….?

    A repository for all things MPCNC or lowrider or printer.

    #87013

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hello guys,

    It’s been a while since I didn’t update this thread.

    I haven’t done much these past months, but I had the opportunity to test the watercooling system for a longer time. It works very well, I didn’t have any issue with it. I’ll continue to test it for a while and then I’ll release the files if I thing it is reliable enough.

    Meanwhile, I finally motivated myself to create a thingiverse account, since I wanted to share a design with our beloved James Bruton so that, hopefully, he could use it to control his pneumatic stuff.

    Anyway, I posted my design for the beefy MPCNC corners and feets. They’ve been installed on my machine for a while and so I can guarantee they work fine. I only made them for the 25mm version so I apologize to all of you living in weird countries who use crazy measurement systems. 🙁

    Anyway, here is the link:

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3398474

    Hope it will be useful!

    #87030

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Awesome, and I hope your part shows up in one of his videos.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #93007

    Dui, ni shuo de dui
    Participant

    Hello everyone,

    It’s been a while, I’ve been busy with many other projects, so didn’t have much time to play with the MPCNC.

    But I did use it to print something useful for a friend: a big electric box so he can hide wires in his home’s wall he’s renovating.

    So firstly I made the design of the box:

    IMG_5769
    IMG_5770

    Then I printed it, using a 1mm nozzle. The walls of the box are 2 mm thick and each layer was 0.5mm. It took around 6 hours to print at fairly low speed because I wanted good adhesion so I also cranked up the temperatures to 225 degree C. This thing is quite strong. I ran out of black filament during the print so I had to replace it with red, hence this weird dual color. It will be painted in white anyway so it doesn’t really matter.

    IMG_5779

    In the end it worked out pretty well:

    IMG_5781
    IMG_5783
    IMG_5789

    I just had a tiny bit of warping on the bottom, probably because my heating plate didn’t quite reach the temperature I intended because the garage was very cold. On the next print I’ll add some flat circles in the design around the corners so it shall adhere better, then I can cut them off after it’s printed. Kinda like a brim, but only where it really matters.

    Also, I forgot to check for squareness before printing so the thing is very slightly off, but it won’t matter much.

    The good thing is that my fully 3D printed water cooling seems to work very well, even at 225 degreeC for 6 hours. I’m now pretty confident it might be reliable. I’ll have to print a second box so I’ll see if it still holds but so far it looks like it works!

     

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    Ryan, BT
    #93455

    Lionel
    Participant

    I have been following your posts for quite a while now, so it’s always nice to get an update on what you have been doing

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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