Milled/printed Prusa Style Printer

New Home Forum Mostly Printed CNC – MPCNC Your Builds – MPCNC Milled/printed Prusa Style Printer

This topic contains 256 replies, has 37 voices, and was last updated by  Ryan 1 year ago.

Viewing 17 posts - 241 through 257 (of 257 total)
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  • #22044

    Dave Gun
    Participant

    Thanks Alvin! I found it in one of the pictures, there is 1 bearing on the bottom rail of the X.

    I have been reading though the entire thread last night. There was a discussion about oil. I put a small dab of cooking oil on a paper towel, fold it up and wrap it around the filament with a bread twist tie. You don’t need much, just enough to clean any dust off the filament. It also seems to coat the inside of the hot head with oil. I only use PLA in the printer I have now, and when I remove the filament, I heat it to 110 – 130, then pull out the filament. The filament in the bottom of the hot head comes out in a plug and removes anything that might be blocking the head with it. The plug comes out slightly oily. In the two years I had the printer, I have never had to take the hot head apart.

    I use Extra Virgin Olive Oil. My other explanation is maybe an offering of a virgin olive to the printer gods might also be part of my success 🙂

    Dave

    #22647

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    I have been printing these for a few days. I am trying PETG, which is usually problematic for me, but I like that color.

    I have to say, these parts have been really easy to print. Kudos to Ryan on these parts, w.r.t. printing. I haven’t assembled anything, so I can’t vouch for how well they work, but they are really good prints.

    #22916

    Bill
    Participant

    OK, I’m at the point where I’m mounting the hot plate on the bed. I figured out where the springs go (front and back corners on the right side, center on the left side. It looks like the BOM calls for 6-32×1″ screws through the hot plate, spring and bed. I’m assuming there are nylock nuts underneath. The problem is the holes in the hot plate are too small for the 6-32 screws. Is it safe to drill those out? The laser cut holes in the bed are too snug, they seem to exactly match the screws side, so I’ll relieve them a bit as well.

    #22920

    Dave Gun
    Participant

    The holes in the bed heater fit a 3mm, but are a bit small for the 6-32 screws. On the black side of the heater, you can see electric traces under the black graphic if you hold it right in a light. If you do not drill into any of these traces, it might work to drill these holes a bit bigger. I decided to go with the 3mm screws. You can see some good pictures of the traces in the heating elements here:

    http://reprap.org/wiki/PCB_Heatbed

    I suggest putting the head of the screw on top since it’s smaller, and the nut underneath. You don’t want the print head to hit these.

    Right now I am working on leveling the bed, a little more challenging than I thought it would be:)

    Dave

    #22921

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    You should be safe with a larger hole I just screw them in no need to drill usually.

    Leveling a 3 screw bed is super easy. Level the two screw side front to back them move it over and do the one screw side.

    #22956

    Bill
    Participant

    Yeah, I’m going to drill the bed out slightly and thread the screws through the hot plate. Should I use something like wing nuts on the bottom to aid in adjustments or is that infrequent enough to just use the same nylocks as elsewhere?

    My fans for the extruder both had really short wires, so I built an extension cable to route them over to the RAMPS. Where do I plug them in and can I power them both from one output or do they plug in separately? I’m assuming they both need to be controlled so you don’t have them running all the time, but don’t know if it’s advantageous to control them separately.

    #22965

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    You probably don’t want nylock nuts, you’ll be adjusting them to level the bed. I can’t find the exact ones I used on my other printer, but I recommend fitting something like these:

    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:955274

    They give you more precision, and they are just easier to grasp. It was the first thing I printed for my current printer.

    The fan on the extruder should be on as long as your printer is on, so tied to 12V. The one that cools the filament, you’ll want to be controlled by the RAMPS. I think it’s the D9 connection.

    #23184

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    D’oh!

    I’ve got today off of work, but the rug rat still has day care available, so I was hoping I’d have all day to get this printer working.

    I just realized that I only have the lead screw nut, not the rod.

    I am going to try to find something that will work locally, any suggestions? I bought the nut from v1, so I _think_ it’s an M8 (or T8)? I’m going to try Fastenal first, I’ve never been but there is one in town. Then I might try ace. But if Fastenal doesn’t have anything, I’m probably stuck.

    On another note, I had all these grand plans for the wood pieces, after I cut them I was going to see how I could personalize them a bit more, but as soon as I saw it coming together, I couldn’t wait to assemble it.

    #23200

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    Well, I’ve since learned that leadscrews != allthread. I went to fastenal, and they have M8 allthread, but not the rod. Ooops. I can only think of one place in all of Denver that has a leadscew that will match the nut that I bought:

    Sorry buddy, I know you’ve given me a lot. It’s time for you to make one more sacrifice. I think I’ll make a built thread now. This is getting somewhat entertaining.

    #23651

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    @bill, I actually just printed 4 of these. I know Ryan prefers 3 screws, but I don’t think these will fit next to the bearing in the third spot:

    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:874155 The M3 nut was a tight fit, but I used a separate screw to pull it into place.

    I really like them, but YMMV. They were slightly rubbing against the 3/4″ screws holding the corners together, so I switched those 4 around.

    #23676

    Bill
    Participant

    @Jeffb3, I just picked up a packet of knurled nuts from eBay to use with the 6-32 screws. Only took like 3 days to arrive, even with the holiday rush. They are not as wide as the ones you’re using, but I didn’t have to finish the printer so I could print them. 🙂

    Attachments:
    #26871

    WarHawk8080
    Participant

    Sweet!

    This thing looks like a DIY version of the Prusa/Anet A8 printer

    Very very cool!

    #26872

    WarHawk8080
    Participant

    Actually just a little squirt of silicon II on the thermistor to glue it down and done…let it dry (or even run up to say 70-80C for a few hours…but the silicon will actually let the thermistor read more accurately as it has a better thermal conductivity than air.

    -edit- sorry this was a response to a question from page 5…couldn’t quote it

    #32436

    Ed Black
    Participant

    is it just me or are there any instruction links to put this thing together? I have been following the pics, but there are some things that would definitely help if there was a plan to follow.

    #32466

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    No other instructions. Let me know what you get stuck on or is unclear and I can add a few more pictures. This was just kind of a fun project I made and people started wanting to build there own. A few have asked for some instructions but seems they didn’t need them in the end other than some belt placement.

    There are a few extremely detailed builds here in the forums as well.

    #34265

    joshua lewis
    Participant

    will this work with an original prusa I3 frame?

    #34266

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Nope

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