Jeb's Lowrider V2 Build

New Home Forum LowRider Your Builds – LowRider Jeb's Lowrider V2 Build

This topic contains 41 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  Mike @Pix2Proto 1 month ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 31 through 42 (of 42 total)
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  • #84526

    Chuck Fischer
    Participant

    Thank you Jeb. That helps a lot with my build. I will have 2 pieces of plywood 1.5″ between the spoil board and the unistrut, I can build something to reference off of that.

    I appreciate the advice for Marlin, I’m not to that point yet, I am just starting the planning phase. But thank you.

    #94196

    Mike @Pix2Proto
    Participant

    Jeb,

    I took inspiration in your Cradle design and made a cradle that could fold out of the way if I had to utilize the full machine space.  Thanks for the great idea/design!

     

     

    #94471

    Jeb
    Participant

    Very cool!  and I like those side rails.

    Are you using the magnets on the plate for a dust shoe?  I just didn’t have enough room to fit anything down there.

     

    Life has been busy here, but I’m still working on my Lowrider:

    • 500watt brushless spindle (spindle in hand, plate designed and cut — need to design dust shoe)
    • 10lb gas struts (in hand, working on side plate designs)

    Keep up the cutting!  Jeb

    #94489

    Tim Jarosz
    Participant

    I’m planning my first LR2 build and currently 3d-printing the main parts. I like the unistrut and laminated pieces of plywood for the rails. My biggest concern was how to get all this level and flat without a good workbench or woodworking tools such as a jointer. Dimensional lumber can be so inexact at a big-box store but the engineered wood looks like a solid alternative. I do have large level concrete floors in my warehouse to work with though. Is there any issue with (lack of) wheel grip using those unistruts? Has anyone put a non-skid sticker on the rails to help with grip? Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Safety-Traction-Abrasive-Residue-Adhesive/dp/B072354ZXS/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=anti+slip+traction+fine+grit&qid=1553530901&s=hi&sr=1-3-catcorr

     

    #94494

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Unistrut adds a whole new level of issue with that (with zero added benefit in my eyes), you basically build a table as flat as possible and then add two rails on each side and try to match them to the table. It is much easier to just make a table and not use the strut.

    #94501

    Mike @Pix2Proto
    Participant

    Jeb,

    Yes, the magnets are meant for a dust shoe (still under development).  I tried some 70mm brushes off Amazon, but they are too long for the LR2.  I bought some foam today and will try utilizing that and see if i can get some better dust control.

    As for the unistrut, I liked the idea of having one continuous piece for the wheels to ride on.  I wanted a 4×4 cut area and this way I could make a 4×4 table and have the unistrut hanging off the front and back for extra travel.  The unistrut came in 10′ lengths so I just cut it in half and mounted it to the sides of the table.  I like that it’s smooth and easy to wipe down.  I was also expecting it to be super straight, but I was not impressed with how straight it was when I was installing.  That being said, I would agree with Ryan that it is unnessesary and adds some complexity to the build for no real gain.  I do plan on flycutting my spoil board, so that should help true up the table back to the unistrut for future projects.

    #94502

    Jeb
    Participant

    Unistrut adds a whole new level of issue with that (with zero added benefit in my eyes), you basically build a table as flat as possible and then add two rails on each side and try to match them to the table. It is much easier to just make a table and not use the strut.

    Agreed.  The Lowrider is a great design and it goes great on a just a table.

    But I do think that if you want to cut 4×8 sheets, that the unistrut rails (with a 4×8 mdf top) are one of the best economical options to get the travel distance needed.  Then you just surface your bed level.

    I don’t think you need grippy pads for the unistrut (or a table).  You aren’t driving the wheels, the belt on the side is the grip.

    #94503

    Tim Jarosz
    Participant

    Unistrut adds a whole new level of issue with that (with zero added benefit in my eyes)

    I don’t doubt that. However, I have it in my mind that I want a full 4’x8′ of usable space. Essentially, I could slide a full sheet onto the table and go. The table has to be larger than a full sheet to accommodate a full sheet.. and I just couldn’t wrap my head around how to get the rails nice and level with either 2×6’s or some weird solution with just small strips of MDF along the edge tops for the rails. I think I’m over-thinking it. Perhaps I should ask how often anyone CNC-mills a full sheet of MDF (or any wood product)? I have two projects in mind and neither are full-sheets (largest would be 36″x42″).

    #96164

    frosty
    Participant

    Perhaps I should ask how often anyone CNC-mills a full sheet of MDF (or any wood product)? I have two projects in mind and neither are full-sheets (largest would be 36″x42″).

    I think the main attraction of a full-sheet machine is the ability to simply load an entire sheet of material on the table and go to town rather than having to break the panel down beforehand so it will fit into the machine.

    #96179

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    There’s also the benefit of not needing to decide how big it needs to be. There’s not much point in making it bigger than 4’x8′, since it’s not that easy to find material bigger than that. Will I want to make new kitchen cabinets? Maybe. Or maybe I’ll want to cut out a 7′ long hat rack. If it’s a full sheet size, I know I can fit it.

    That being said, the more experience I get with the machine, the more I want something in the 2.5’x3.5′ range, and the low rider is still a great machine at that size.

    #97660

    Mike @Pix2Proto
    Participant

    So I didn’t care for the deflection that I was getting with the long moment arm on the first cradle design, so I went back to the drawing board and put a foot on it.  You can home the machine in the cradle then move the machine and rotate the cradle out of the way to get the full work area of the machine.

    #97663

    Mike @Pix2Proto
    Participant

    And here is my dust skirt that I came up with.  All 4 sides are each attached with some Harbor Freight Rare Earth magnets and the skirt is cut from some 1/8″ craft foam just hot glued on.  Works pretty darn well for a first attempt.

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