Grand Designs CNC House

New Home Forum Random or Off Topic Grand Designs CNC House

This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  K Cummins 1 week, 1 day ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #117235

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    It’s on metflix. Grand Designs Season 10 Ep 2.

    It is really neat. I watched it with my wife and got a premtive “no”, but I’ll keep working on her.

    #117307

    Bill
    Participant

    That was really neat. Georgia had me watch episode 1 several weeks ago and I just hadn’t gotten back to it. I wonder what those designers are doing now, 8 years later?

    #117406

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    That was pretty cool. I kept wondering why they were making all sides to every box. You have a CNC make parts and put it together as you go. Couple screws or nails instead of the wood clips they had. But dang, it seems like a great idea somewhere between that and full prefab houses that have to ship on a bunch of large trucks. I really hope we start seeing some of these new home building ideas become more mainstream soon. I love the look of old neighborhoods where all the houses where pretty different.

    #117407

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    That lead me into the show abstract…I envy designers in most disciplines. Seeing the creativity they have is unreal to me. I think I see things in terms of efficiency and cost, they rarely think of that and I feel that is a good thing. Like somehow there imaginations are not stifled.

    #117408

    Mark Selig
    Participant

    In the housing industry there are traditional stick built houses, and prefab houses, and wall panel houses that are the main stream.  There are also prefab houses, but you want to see something really cool!

    I have been following the 3d printing houses with concrete.  ICON here in the states is one of the companies I have been following.  Amazing to watch but got to say that the future will show if the building departments will allow.

    Printing a home in a much less time, and faster?  Sounds like a good idea to me.

    #117411

    K Cummins
    Participant

    I’m thinking that getting an even coat of glue stick on the foundation is tricky…

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #117421

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    The key is going to be the tools to make the design and changes easier. I would also love to see more variance in new subdivisions, but you’d really need a fast way to make a design change, have it pass through all the engineering tests, be visualized by the decision maker (the new home owner, ideally) and then change all the file downstream. The speed of that loop will determine how varied the houses are.

    Of course, there are sales department concerns too though. Paralysis of choice going to have a big impact on the speed of sales and having infinite choice is going to make that super hard.

    #117501

    Barry
    Participant

    That lead me into the show abstract…I envy designers in most disciplines. Seeing the creativity they have is unreal to me. I think I see things in terms of efficiency and cost, they rarely think of that and I feel that is a good thing. Like somehow there imaginations are not stifled.

    Then you have the engineers that are working in the wrong area of expertise.  I ran some network cable in a dude’s house that was finishing his basement.  The house was a spec house, but the basement wasn’t finished.  He was doing all the work himself.  The basement was bigger than my great room, and was being turned into two bedrooms and a home theater.  He pocket hole screwed all the studs to the top and base plates on all the walls!!!!  By himself, with one of those shitty clamp on kreg jigs!!!!!

    #117517

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Oh no! I can see that happening ” Don’t worry dear, I am an engineer I know what I am doing. Pass me the jig please.”

    #117519

    K Cummins
    Participant

    At least you’ve got a decent reference for driving the screws. None of that crazy driving nails at an angle… Talk about triggering Engineering OCD.

    Nails should be driven in perpendicular to the surface, and screws should always follow their pilot holes (you do always drill pilot holes, right?). I won’t discuss the proper orientation for drilling holes at this time, but suffice it to say that specialty equipment (e.g., a Kreg jig) allows for a wider variety of allowable options.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.