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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Ryan 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

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  • #104604

    Oscar Salcedo
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I am in the planning stages of a Lowrider2 build and I am trying to figure out a few things before I get started.

    My only requirement is to be able to cut 4×8 ft. sheets. I think I have the hardware portion figured out for the most part. I will go with the LowRider2 CNC Bundle.

    Looking at the table design however, I have a few questions:

    • I trust that the calculator is giving me the right table dimensions; I have seen some comments in the forum that a few inches should be added to the X and Y lengths in order to accommodate for your max. cut lengths. Can someone confirm?
    • I’d like for the table structure to be solid; has anyone used the series 40 80/20 profiles? This one specifically, has a flat side that would be ideal for the rollers (Y-Axis) to ride on: https://8020.net/40-4003-black.html# .  I would attach 3/4″ MDF to the top and bottom, and add cross beams between the two Y-Axis. Thoughts?
    • How important is the base? I see people running their 4×8 on saw horses. I could do the legs with 80/20 as well (see pic below), but that would increase the cost considerably.
    • I have access to machining the flat parts aluminum; would you recommend that over MDF? or would it add unnecessary weight to the X-Axis?

    Looking forward to hearing your ideas.

    Thanks!

    Attachments:
    #104608

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    I have build in a little over 1/2″ extra on the table size.

    The point of this machine is the price vs. quality of cuts.

    If you are going to buy 100+feet of extrusion, that kind of defeats the purpose. I understanding wanting to start off on the best foot but you are trying to fix problems that do not exist. Build it as cheaply as possible, if you have any issues, you will then have a CNC to cut parts for a new table and still save hundreds over extrusion.

    Sheet material conforms to OD bends very well, so concentrate on making it as flat as possible on the short axis and the long axis matters very little.

    This sort of thing comes up a lot here. People “solving” problems but have not tried it my way first, then it snowballs into people following in those tracks and saying that is better. I promise, my livelihood depends on this, if something was better and fairly inexpensive I would do it or point it out, such as making a table beefier. If you do have issues with a bumpy table, you can just surface it and be good.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #104609

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    On that note I should also add I have only ever seen 1 machine actually cut anything bigger than 4′. Ripping down sheet material is much much easier than every single cut having to be made slower just so you can build a 4×8 machine to accommodate a full sheet. Mine is 2×4 and it is still much larger than anything I cut, even when doing batch goods. I only have the patience for 1-2 hours of babysitting a machine.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #104611

    Oscar Salcedo
    Participant

    Excellent feedback Ryan. Thank you!

    I see your point and I agree. The Engineer in me tends to over-analyze every possible aspect of the project, and you are correct: start with something, iterate, improve if needed.

     

    Thanks again!

    #104612

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    High five!

    Sorry that comes of preachy sometimes, but I think you get it. I just heard “expensive parts” and reacted…

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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