Benchy

This topic contains 40 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  JMS 2 days, 5 hours ago.

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  • #97035

    Tim
    Participant

    Since most of us have 3D printers, I know some people buy the printed parts.  I am sure most of us have printed benchys.  So I propose that we, as a group develop a MPCNC_BENCHY.  Or two, one for wood, one for aluminum?  The crown is s good test of  operation and movement.  I propose a g-code that would be more operational.  What are the groups thoughts?  What would be helpful? What would we test? What would be tested. I am thinking about a code that tests

    accuracy.

    repeatability

    Depth of cut.

    max speeds

    thoughts?

    T

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #97036

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Something at least semi useful, like at least a drink coaster, endmill holder or something. It would be awesome.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    Tim
    #97037

    Tim
    Participant

    Coaster a great idea.  Ok to use V1

    logo?

    add tool to be 1/8” single flute end mill

    #97041

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Ok to use V1 logo?

    Of course! That does give me an idea. The logo can only be cut in two ways because of the sharp corners, one is with a V Bit, the other is in three levels of Z. The sharp surround on the tallest level, the surround the middle layer, and the letters and logo all the way through? The second way could be a decent test piece, rounder corners give accurate diagonal measurements even.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #97042

    kd2018
    Participant

    What about a speed square for the shop?

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #97043

    David Walling
    Participant

    What about a speed square for the shop?

     

    My machine wasn’t square the first time I cut something. Cutting a speed square would be me just cutting scraps into smaller scraps 🙂

    I like the idea of the coaster. Make a nice circle with just the triangular design part of the logo centered in it.

    #97047

    kd2018
    Participant

    My machine wasn’t square the first time I cut something. Cutting a speed square would be me just cutting scraps into smaller scraps 🙂

    I thought that was OP’s point to create a benchy or benchmark part to test and calibrate the machine.

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 5 hours ago by  kd2018.
    • This reply was modified 6 days, 5 hours ago by  kd2018.
    #97049

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    More of a calibration piece so even if a coaster wasn’t perfect it could be used. Might even be cool to have a set that got more perfect each try, a progressive set.

    #97051

    Sean
    Participant

    Round over would be a good test as well for the Z axis vs just a plunge.

    #97052

    Sean
    Participant

    Could even do more advanced logo/coasters that test different bits.

    #97053

    kd2018
    Participant

    Need a customizable gcode post processor (python or something) to tweak feed rates, depth of cut, etc for different stages of the testing?

    #97054

    Tim
    Participant

    Fusion 360 has the option to open G-code With “Brackets”. I recommend doing this.  I think we need to keep this simple to start.  I envision a 6″ x 6″ piece of material.  With V1 logo and anything else we want to add.  Maybe slots, at various speeds and feeds, plunge rates. bored holes various sizes

    respectfully

    T

    Screen-Shot-2019-04-15-at-11.44.43-AM

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #97056

    Tim
    Participant

    Ryan/Sean

    great idea. A series of benchys, going from simple to complex, adding more tests, and features.  First one single tool. what does everyone think about a 1/8″ single flute end mill ?

     

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #97071

    Sean
    Participant

    I think thats the milling equivalent to a #2 pencil! Good idea. I mean it goes crazy from there right?! I mean V-bit (of varying degrees), ball nose (of varying sizes), 1/16th”, 1/32″. Thats jus the bits I can think of right now! I like the idea of using the logo since its a little bit of showing off/branding every time you make one.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    Tim
    #97072

    Sean
    Participant

    Need a customizable gcode post processor (python or something) to tweak feed rates, depth of cut, etc for different stages of the testing?

    Interesting idea, I mean the sky’s the limit, sizes, different phases (V1-Benchy-2.0), would be cool to know that everyones working from a similar Gcode, so I guess the more settings the less true that is..

    Perhaps to add to repeatability, just overall size and DOC, and Benchy version? (Assuming there is more than 1 version)

    #97081

    Aaryn
    Participant

    I love this entire thread.  I’ll throw this idea into the mix but I may have just missed it if it was already suggested.

    What if the V1-Benchy was intentionaly cut as two pieces then pressed or fitted together.  Especially if they were intended to be cut with one oriented in the X direction and the other in the Y direction.  aka one is rotated 90 degrees.  That way when you try to press them together you can see if your axes are correct, tight, square.

    And what do we call Name this?

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 2 hours ago by  Aaryn.
    1 user thanked author for this post.
    Tim
    #97084

    Tim
    Participant

    Aaryn

    i like the idea.  I think it hits two points, the axis are square and parallel.  Is there a better/simpler  way to check this?  Will the test give visible indication of the problem?

    T

    #97086

    Tim
    Participant

    Just thought 2 pieces that fit together, one inside the other. Now we have added some tolerance to the mix.  I vote for calling it MPCNC_BENCHY_Vx

    #97189

    kd2018
    Participant

    Is there a better/simpler way to check this?

    A pen mount and simply drawing some big right triangles would probably be the most straightforward… but probably not as much fun.

    #97194

    Aaryn
    Participant

    A pen mount and simply drawing some big right triangles would probably be the most straightforward… but probably not as much fun.

    True.  I like the idea of doing the X/Y comparison as part of a paper plotter test.  Probably something square shaped that can be folded on the diagonal to see if it all lines up.  That is a LOT easier for a beginner.

    I retract the idea of the two piece coaster.  Let’s keep the V1 MPCNC Benchy a single piece that tests a few other things.

    I think the current design works pretty well.  It might benefit from a lip around the outer edge but it doesn’t need one.

    #97203

    JMS
    Participant

    A pen won’t tell you if you are level on all sides though.

    1st have to be sure you are level, getting level was not easy on all corners. Took a few tries and foam board. Level and spacers said I was dead on but a cutting bit and foam board proved I wasn’t

    2nd have to be sure it is not skewed

    crown shows it is working but that is mostly all it does

    Cutting squares, circles and stars will prove accuracy

    then a V1 logo benchy to show it off and promote the machine. Cut in half and flipped is not a bad idea

    we need several designs for this to simplify the setup.

    #97207

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Cutting squares, circles and stars will prove accuracy then a V1 logo benchy to show it off and promote the machine.

    A logo part with careful dimensions can tell you a lot (most everything about accuracy and precision) in one part. Outer dimensions just for accuracy, diagonal measurements for skew/square, height and depth at multiple points can tell you about your Z and level. From there if you have dual endstops you can power down, run the same code again (without moving the part) and verify no material was removed and all dimensions are still within your expected/needed results. From what I can figure there is not other tests needed? After that it become material and job specific, example would be PCB’s and a trace width test.

    crown shows it is working but that is mostly all it does

    Shows if an axis is flipped, dimensions are close, build is semi flat, and step rate and speed is close. Using a plot as the first real test makes sure things are close enough to have fun. If you need more accuracy (most surprisingly do not) a cut out part is needed.

    #97208

    Ryan
    Keymaster

    The crown is a fun plot and a great first test. Some people really do enjoy calibrations beyond what is necessary. I will add a more accurate plot with dimensions to the page here soon with dimensions to give a little more usefulness to the plotting, before a milling test.

     

    I think we are close to a good test piece but I think more can be had in one test.

    #97210

    Tim
    Participant

    Thoughts

    do we need tabs on the cut out?

    double sided tape ok for hold down? If the benchy is run early, people might not have table set up/drilled

    a couple of facing operations on the corners?

    would most of you do the cut out in one pass?

    T

    #97218

    kd2018
    Participant

    A pen won’t tell you if you are level on all sides though.

    Could you not just use a sheet of paper as a feeler gauge to check all around for level in the same way you would for leveling a 3d printer bed? Either way I don’t want to stray from the theme of the thread, a milled part is more fun.

    #97257

    JMS
    Participant

    Cutting squares, circles and stars will prove accuracy then a V1 logo benchy to show it off and promote the machine.

    A logo part with careful dimensions can tell you a lot (most everything about accuracy and precision) in one part. Outer dimensions just for accuracy, diagonal measurements for skew/square, height and depth at multiple points can tell you about your Z and level. From there if you have dual endstops you can power down, run the same code again (without moving the part) and verify no material was removed and all dimensions are still within your expected/needed results. From what I can figure there is not other tests needed? After that it become material and job specific, example would be PCB’s and a trace width test.

    crown shows it is working but that is mostly all it does

    Shows if an axis is flipped, dimensions are close, build is semi flat, and step rate and speed is close. Using a plot as the first real test makes sure things are close enough to have fun. If you need more accuracy (most surprisingly do not) a cut out part is needed.

    Correct, that is what we want to achieve without a lot of hassle
    The crown shows that it is working as it should, mostly. But not entirely.
    It absolutely is the first test you should run.

    But beyond that, we need to get into finer details.

    No, it does not have to be within a millionth of a pico meter.

    It can save time over all in the straightening of the gantry over all.
    Some designs that can be duplicated across every machine built.
    Saving individuals from having to figure out how to get setup for best accuracy possible.
    Some feeds and speeds that can give people a starting point with a specific type of material (foam board).

    The final result would be a wood milled V1 Logo that is close to perfect if not perfect in alignment.

    I am on board with the idea of a benchy.

    but you have to crawl before you can run.

    A pen won’t tell you if you are level on all sides though.

    Could you not just use a sheet of paper as a feeler gauge to check all around for level in the same way you would for leveling a 3d printer bed? Either way I don’t want to stray from the theme of the thread, a milled part is more fun.

    The sheet of paper idea I did not think of cause I was in the middle of testing on a foam board that I already had down.

     

    #97258

    JMS
    Participant

    A logo part with careful dimensions can tell you a lot (most everything about accuracy and precision) in one part.

    True, but it also can take longer and if it’s not correct, you have to start over.
    This should be a final test.

    #97271

    Barry
    Participant

    How about something that connects to a 3d printed part?  Along this idea, but not necessarily this part.

    #97389

    JMS
    Participant

    Corrections made and new ZIP file uploaded.  This one is 2 hours 25 minutes.
    _______________________________________________________

    I like Barry’s idea also.

    But here is what I came up with for a final test.

    I have not run this yet, but may try tonight or this weekend

    PLEASE keep in mind that I have very little idea if my settings for the Bit is correct or not.

    You will find attached, the Estlcam g-code and project file in a zip file below.
    I also included the DXF and SVG.

    You use them at your OWN RISK

    Please let me know if any changes need to be made. Thank you.
    ——————————————————————————————————

    This Benchy should be the final test of your MPCNC with Dual End Stops
    This should be very very repeatable, so you can make a set of 4+.

    Parameters:

    The part is 4in (101.6mm) x 4in (101.6mm)

    Material Size: 5in (127mm) x 5in (127mm)
    Thickness: 1/2in (12.7mm) minimum

    place your material 2in (50.8mm) Left and 2in (50.8mm) Up

    BenchyV1LogoPlacement

    Using a 1/8in (0.125mm) 2 Flute Carbide Long bit
    1/8″ 2 Flute Carbide Long

    8th-inch-2-Flute-Carbide-Long-Tool-list

    End Mill 1/8th inch
    3.175mm
    2.00mm
    90*
    15.00mm/s
    2.00mm/s
    24000rpm
    blank
    blank
    blank
    blank
    5.0%
    0.00%
    50.0%
    0.02mm
    90*
    0.00mm
    0.00mm
    0.00mm

    In order of cuts

    Inside ring:
    Hole
    Toolpath depth: 5.00mm
    Start Level: 0.00mm
    Machining Order: 1
    Holding Tab Length: 0.00mm
    Holding Tab Height: Full (this doesn’t matter cause it’s 0.00mm)
    Finishing Tool:
    Finishing Allowance: 0.00mm
    Pocketing Strategy: Linear
    Chamfering tool:
    Chamfer width: 0.00mm
    Pocket

    Carve Logo Outline, V and 1:
    Carve
    Depth Limit: 3.00mm
    Start Level: 5.00mm
    Maximum carve width: 2.33mm
    Carve Pocketing Tool: End Mill 1/8″
    Machining Order: this will actually be 2, 3, 4, 5
    Finishing Allowance: 0.00mm

    Carve Logo Design:
    Carve
    Depth Limit: 3.00mm
    Start Level: 5.00mm
    Maximum carve width: 10mm
    Carve Pocketing Tool: End Mill 1/8″
    Machining Order: 6
    Finishing Allowance: 0.00mm

    Engraving Outside Ring:
    Engraving at the Left Side of shape
    Toolpath depth: 12.70mmmm
    Start Level: 0.00mm
    Machining Order: 7 or higher should be the last cut
    Holding Tab Length: 5.00mm
    Holding Tab Height: Full
    Finishing Tool:
    Finishing Allowance: 0.00mm

    • This reply was modified 4 days, 4 hours ago by  JMS.
    • This reply was modified 4 days, 4 hours ago by  JMS.
    • This reply was modified 3 days, 23 hours ago by  JMS. Reason: changed 0.125 to 3.175
    • This reply was modified 3 days, 23 hours ago by  JMS.
    #97417

    Tim
    Participant

    No sure a unproven 20 hour G-code is in the spirit of this post?

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